The Armory Show

March 2 - 5, 2017
Piers 92 & 94
New York City

Armory Arts Week Events

 

 

Sunday February 28th

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Monday February 29th

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
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Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
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Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
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MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
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Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
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Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
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Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
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Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
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Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
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Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
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Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
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The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
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Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
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Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
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Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
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The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
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Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
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Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
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The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
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Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
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Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

Tuesday March 1st

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

101 Spring Street

Judd Foundation
101 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012

In 1968, Donald Judd purchased 101 Spring Street, a five-story cast-iron building designed by Nicholas Whyte and constructed in 1870. Serving as his New York home and studio, 101 Spring Street is the place of origin for Judd’s theory of permanent installation. The collection on view at 101 Spring Street remains as installed by Judd and includes works by Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, David Novros, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, and Frank Stella. Judd Foundation also offers custom visits for individuals and groups by appointment.

Institution Hours: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 1PM, 3PM and 5PM, and on Saturdays at 11AM, 1PM, 2PM and 4PM.
RSVP: Yes, advance reservations for guided visits required.

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11AM – 5PM, Saturday 12PM – 5PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

FUSION NY

West Harlem Art Fund
Red Rooster: 310 Lenox New York, NY 10012; Rendell Memorial Presbyterian Church: 59 W 137th St #61, New York, NY 10037; National Jazz Museum in Harlem: 58 W. 129th Street, New York, NY 10027

FUSION New York is a thematic event series comprised of art exhibitions, panels, a jazz concert, and tours during Armory Week 2016.



FUSION is more than an art event it’s an innovation platform that explores the need for injecting more diversity in the creative industries. Facilitators for this event will be sourced from top universities, museums, and think tanks.



Our FUSION CORNER is a concept space that welcomes collectors who are passionate about art and high-end lifestyle products in unique combinations.



Confirmed panelists include Bill T. Jones, Hrag Vartanian, Nadessha Godamunne, Maddy Maxey and Erica Kermani.



Event partners: Arttable, Center for an Urban Future, National Jazz Museum in Harlem, Studio Museum in Harlem, Welcome to Harlem



Media Partner: WBAI Radio

Event Hours: 9:30AM – 8PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

EFA Open House

The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts
323 West 39th Street, New York, NY 10018

As part of Armory Arts Week, we invite you to view over 60 Open Studios and visit the EFA Project Space and Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop on Tuesday, March 1 from 5:00-9:00pm. EFA Center is located at 323 W. 39th Street, between 8th and 9th Avenues. EFA Studios member artists work in a wide range of media and artistic sensibilities, creating a vibrant and diverse community of peers under one roof. Artists on floors 3-10 will have their studios open to welcome guests to explore and interact with their artwork.

5:00PM - 9:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

Wednesday March 2nd

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bronx Culture Trolley and Panel Discussion AFRICAN PHOTOGRAPHY/ WORK IN THE US AND IN AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College:450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

Laylah Barrayn, artist in Senegal, Janet Goldner, artist in Mali, Howard Cash, artist across West Africa, Osaretin Ugiagbe, artist in the Bronx, moderated by Atim Annette Oton, curator, public programming.

5:00PM - 9:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM-5PM

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

NEW YORK SHITTY an off-off Armory Show

Con Artist Collective
119 Ludlow Street, New York NY 10002

Street Art has made conversation on the street, in the public space, for decades.



Non commissioned, uncensored, unwanted, resented and prosecuted:

the many forms of street art have demanded dialog, have created a visual conversation between artists and the public.

It remains an ongoing visual response and expression to social issues.

At this point also invited and commissioned, street art keeps changing forms and mediums reflecting current art practice and technology.



In the Con Artist Collective we find any expression from nitty gritty urban raw energy to conceptual design with positive messages.

Lock on sculptures, stencil work, wheatpasted posters, murals, theater, sculptural street installations, live art, graffiti, art trucks.



Artists: Emil Tibell (Sweden), T.mas (Italy), Motherpigeon, Wizard Skull , G Piedmont,

Frank Ape, Dave Tree, Lenore Cohen, Fishwithbraids, Josef Pinlac,

Ty Douglas, Julz Roth, Jenny Heissenhuber, Sarah Wang, The Lady Jacqueline, Roland, Soledad, Omer Gal, James McGann, Subtexture, G-spot Crew, Lucky Rabbit



The opening reception March 2, 7 – 11pm welcomes all art and streetart friends and collectors with an art happening!

7:00PM - 9:00PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Walter De Maria, The Broken Kilometer (Dia:Soho)

Dia Art Foundation
The Broken Kilometer; 393 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012

The Broken Kilometer, 1979, located at 393 West Broadway in New York City, is composed of 500 highly polished, round, solid brass rods, each measuring two meters in length and five centimeters (two inches) in diameter. The 500 rods are placed in five parallel rows of 100 rods each. The sculpture weighs 18 3/4 tons and would measure 3,280 feet if all the elements were laid end-to-end. Each rod is placed such that the spaces between the rods increase by 5mm with each consecutive space, from front to back; the first two rods of each row are placed 80mm apart, the last two rods are placed 570 mm apart. Metal halide stadium lights illuminate the work which is 45 feet wide and 125 feet long. This work is the companion piece to De Maria's 1977 Vertical Earth Kilometer at Kassel, Germany. In that permanently installed earth sculpture, a brass rod of the same diameter, total weight and total length has been inserted 1,000 meters into the ground. The Broken Kilometer has been on long-term view to the public since 1979. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, between Broome and Grand

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture is the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create meditative drawings on antique ledger paper. This new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, consists of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form. The second architectural space holds a monumental frieze drawing that is 60 feet x 6 feet. The drawing depicts the relationship between a material form and a subtle body. Also conceptual artist Aaron Taylor Kuffner is presenting his gamelatron, an original instrument created by Kuffner that is a robotic variant of the gamelan.

12:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
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Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
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Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
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Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
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Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
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Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Suzanne McClelland: Articulate Muscle

Dieu Donné
315 West 36th Street, New York, NY 100018

Dieu Donné will present an exhibition of new works in handmade paper and a video projection by Suzanne McClelland. These works were created during the artist's Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné and will be on view from March 2-April 9, 2016.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11AM – 5PM, Saturday 12PM – 5PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

FUSION NY

West Harlem Art Fund
Red Rooster: 310 Lenox New York, NY 10012; Rendell Memorial Presbyterian Church: 59 W 137th St #61, New York, NY 10037; National Jazz Museum in Harlem: 58 W. 129th Street, New York, NY 10027

FUSION New York is a thematic event series comprised of art exhibitions, panels, a jazz concert, and tours during Armory Week 2016.



FUSION is more than an art event it’s an innovation platform that explores the need for injecting more diversity in the creative industries. Facilitators for this event will be sourced from top universities, museums, and think tanks.



Our FUSION CORNER is a concept space that welcomes collectors who are passionate about art and high-end lifestyle products in unique combinations.



Confirmed panelists include Bill T. Jones, Hrag Vartanian, Nadessha Godamunne, Maddy Maxey and Erica Kermani.



Event partners: Arttable, Center for an Urban Future, National Jazz Museum in Harlem, Studio Museum in Harlem, Welcome to Harlem



Media Partner: WBAI Radio

Event Hours: 9:30AM – 8PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Tuo Wang Screening and Conversation with Herb Tam

Residency Unlimited
360 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 (entrance through the main green doors of the church)

Herb Tam, curator of exhibitions and director at the Museum of Chinese in Americas engages with the New York based Chinese artist Tuo Wang for a special screening of a recent body of work realized in part during his residency at RU. Wang’s multidisciplinary practice is often balanced between performance and film. In his discussion with the artist, Herb Tam will review Wang’s process that combines interview, non-linear editing and research on literature and cinema to construct a maze of melodrama.

6:30PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Opening | FADE IN: INT. ART GALLERY – DAY

Swiss Institute
18 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Exploring the role that the visual arts have played in cinema and television history, whether as props, set dressings, plot devices, character cues and other symbols, this exhibition considers artworks that have been created to appear onscreen. Recasting the gallery as a set for a dramatic scene, the exhibition features a history of art as seen in classic movies and low-budget soap operas, science fiction, pornography and musicals, where complex ideas, objects and characters are processed, played with, misunderstood and celebrated. FADE IN features work inspired by the artwork made to appear on screen, which has been sourced, reproduced and created by artists including: Danai Anesiadou, Nairy Baghramian, Michael Bell-Smith, Dora Budor, Heman Chong, Mike Cooter, Brice Dellsperger, Casey Jane Ellison, GALA Committee, Mario García Torres, Mathis Gasser, Alex Israel, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Bertrand Lavier, William Leavitt, Christian Marclay, Rodrigo Matheus, Allan McCollum, Henrique Medina, Carissa Rodriguez, Cindy Sherman, Amie Siegel, Scott Stark, Thirteen Black Cats, Albert Whitlock.



6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

Thursday March 3rd

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

101 Spring Street

Judd Foundation
101 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012

In 1968, Donald Judd purchased 101 Spring Street, a five-story cast-iron building designed by Nicholas Whyte and constructed in 1870. Serving as his New York home and studio, 101 Spring Street is the place of origin for Judd’s theory of permanent installation. The collection on view at 101 Spring Street remains as installed by Judd and includes works by Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, David Novros, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, and Frank Stella. Judd Foundation also offers custom visits for individuals and groups by appointment.

Institution Hours: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 1PM, 3PM and 5PM, and on Saturdays at 11AM, 1PM, 2PM and 4PM.
RSVP: Yes, advance reservations for guided visits required.

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Walter De Maria, The Broken Kilometer (Dia:Soho)

Dia Art Foundation
The Broken Kilometer; 393 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012

The Broken Kilometer, 1979, located at 393 West Broadway in New York City, is composed of 500 highly polished, round, solid brass rods, each measuring two meters in length and five centimeters (two inches) in diameter. The 500 rods are placed in five parallel rows of 100 rods each. The sculpture weighs 18 3/4 tons and would measure 3,280 feet if all the elements were laid end-to-end. Each rod is placed such that the spaces between the rods increase by 5mm with each consecutive space, from front to back; the first two rods of each row are placed 80mm apart, the last two rods are placed 570 mm apart. Metal halide stadium lights illuminate the work which is 45 feet wide and 125 feet long. This work is the companion piece to De Maria's 1977 Vertical Earth Kilometer at Kassel, Germany. In that permanently installed earth sculpture, a brass rod of the same diameter, total weight and total length has been inserted 1,000 meters into the ground. The Broken Kilometer has been on long-term view to the public since 1979. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

New Prints 2016/ Winter : Artist Talks

International Print Center New York
508 West 26th Street, 5A, New York, NY 10001

New Prints 2016/Winter will be on view through March 26. Selected by Diana Burroughs (Director, Marlborough Graphics), Clare Garfield (Collector), Carl Fudge (Artist), Justin Sanz (Workshop Manager, EFA Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop), David Senior (Bibliographer, MoMA Library), and Marie Tennyson (Assistant Director, LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies at Columbia University), the exhibition is the fifty third presentation of IPCNY’s New Prints Program, a series of juried exhibitions organized three times each year featuring prints made with the past twelve months.

5:00PM - 7:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, between Broome and Grand

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture is the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create meditative drawings on antique ledger paper. This new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, consists of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form. The second architectural space holds a monumental frieze drawing that is 60 feet x 6 feet. The drawing depicts the relationship between a material form and a subtle body. Also conceptual artist Aaron Taylor Kuffner is presenting his gamelatron, an original instrument created by Kuffner that is a robotic variant of the gamelan.

12:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Suzanne McClelland: Articulate Muscle

Dieu Donné
315 West 36th Street, New York, NY 100018

Dieu Donné will present an exhibition of new works in handmade paper and a video projection by Suzanne McClelland. These works were created during the artist's Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné and will be on view from March 2-April 9, 2016.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Heart of Hearts by Collective-LOK

Times Square Arts
Duffy Square, Times Square

Times Square Arts has announced that Collective–LOK is the winner of this year’s annual Times Square Valentine Heart Design curated by the Center for Architecture. Over the last eight years, the Times Square Alliance has invited architecture and design firms to submit proposals for a romantic public art installation celebrating Valentine’s Day in Times Square. This year’s winning design, Heart of Hearts, was unveiled on February 9, and remains on view through March 6 at Father Duffy Square, between 46th and 47th Streets.



CLOK’s Heart of Hearts, a faceted ring of twelve golden, mirrored hearts, will create an alternative pavilion that reflects and multiplies the pulsating activity of Times Square, creating a kaleidoscopic interior that dissolves the boundaries between viewing and performing. Within the ring, diamond-shaped spaces inside each heart will create six “kissing booths” where couples will find their activities mirrored, allowing both privacy and publicity in the Heart of Hearts. This room within the room of Times Square is the most site-specific Heart installation to date and will be the first time a Valentine Heart will reach 10 feet.





RSVP: No

Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11AM – 5PM, Saturday 12PM – 5PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Nick Brandt: Inherit the Dust Armory Show Preview

Edwynn Houk Gallery
745 5th Avenue #407, New York, NY 10151

From Thursday, March 3rd- Saturday, March 5th Edwynn Houk Gallery will offer a special preview of Nick Brandt's new exhibition Inherit the Dust for attendees of The Armory Show. For the exhibition Brandt has returned to East Africa to photograph the escalating changes of the continent’s natural world and its animals in a series of epic panoramas. In each location, Brandt erected a life-size panel of one of his animal portrait photographs—showing groups of elephants, rhinos, giraffes, lions, cheetahs and zebras—within sites of explosive urban development in order to demonstrate the displacement of these animals from what was once their natural habitat.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New Acquisitions: Chagall, Chamberlain, Dubuffet, Francis, Glees, Maillol, Moore, Picasso and others

James Goodman Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 802, New York, NY 10022

Selection of works by Contemporary and Modern masters.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday March 5th, 11AM – 5:30PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

FUSION NY

West Harlem Art Fund
Red Rooster: 310 Lenox New York, NY 10012; Rendell Memorial Presbyterian Church: 59 W 137th St #61, New York, NY 10037; National Jazz Museum in Harlem: 58 W. 129th Street, New York, NY 10027

FUSION New York is a thematic event series comprised of art exhibitions, panels, a jazz concert, and tours during Armory Week 2016.



FUSION is more than an art event it’s an innovation platform that explores the need for injecting more diversity in the creative industries. Facilitators for this event will be sourced from top universities, museums, and think tanks.



Our FUSION CORNER is a concept space that welcomes collectors who are passionate about art and high-end lifestyle products in unique combinations.



Confirmed panelists include Bill T. Jones, Hrag Vartanian, Nadessha Godamunne, Maddy Maxey and Erica Kermani.



Event partners: Arttable, Center for an Urban Future, National Jazz Museum in Harlem, Studio Museum in Harlem, Welcome to Harlem



Media Partner: WBAI Radio

Event Hours: 9:30AM – 8PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Opening of From Minimalism Into Algorithm

The Kitchen
512 West 19th Street, New York, NY 10011

Taking place in The Kitchen theater and gallery spaces throughout the 2015–2016 season, From Minimalism into Algorithm sets contemporary and historical painting, sculpture, performance, and musical composition in counterpoint, proposing a new through-line for art-making during the past half century. Organized collaboratively by The Kitchen and participating artists, the exhibition takes up the legacy of Minimalist art and composition during the 1960s and ’70s as a precedent for reconsidering work by a younger generation for whom serial repetition corresponds more directly with digital technology and, moreover, its reconfiguring of our encounters with physical space through networked communication. The exhibition will unfold in three phases throughout the winter and among the artists included in the third are Tauba Auerbach, Tony Conrad, Liz Deschenes, Charles Gaines, Wade Guyton, Zoe Leonard, Seth Price, Paul Sietsema, Laurie Spiegel, Christine Sun Kim, Cheyney Thompson, and others. Photo:  Laurie Spiegel.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Exclusive Tour of Private Art Collection of American Sculptor Chaim Gross (1904-91)

Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation
526 LaGuardia Pl, New York, NY 10012

An exclusive tour by art historian and Foundation Executive Director Dr. Susan Fisher of the astounding private art collection of American sculptor Chaim Gross. Featuring 20th-Century American and European art by artists including De Kooning, Avery, Ernst, Chagall, and Matta; historical African art including a world-renowned collection of Asante gold weights; significant examples of Pre-Columbian art, and Judaica that is all now under the stewardship of the Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation. The collection remains installed in Gross’s historic Greenwich Village home as he had it during his lifetime. The Foundation has been called an “art treasure of New York City” by the Wall Street Journal.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 1PM – 5PM

Closing Reception and Magazine Launch: Total Effekt: Living Magazine

Recess
41 Grand Street, New York, NY 10013

Artist collective Total Effekt will be working on Living Magazine as part of  Recess’s signature program, Session.  Session invites artists to use Recess’s public space as studio, exhibition venue, and grounds for experimentation. Throughout their Session, Total Effekt will produce a lifestyle magazine that reflects on contemporary city life and modes of feeling at home and at ease in one’s environment.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

James Nares: Portraits 

Paul Kasmin Gallery
293 10th Avenue, 10001 New York, NY 10001

Please contact the gallery for further information.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Marcel Broodthaers: Complete Editions and Other Works

Paul Kasmin Gallery
515 W. 27th Street, New York, NY 10001 

Please contact the gallery for further information.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Morris Louis/Landon Metz

Paul Kasmin Gallery
297 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10001 

Please contact the gallery for further information.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

Friday March 4th

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

101 Spring Street

Judd Foundation
101 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012

In 1968, Donald Judd purchased 101 Spring Street, a five-story cast-iron building designed by Nicholas Whyte and constructed in 1870. Serving as his New York home and studio, 101 Spring Street is the place of origin for Judd’s theory of permanent installation. The collection on view at 101 Spring Street remains as installed by Judd and includes works by Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, David Novros, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, and Frank Stella. Judd Foundation also offers custom visits for individuals and groups by appointment.

Institution Hours: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 1PM, 3PM and 5PM, and on Saturdays at 11AM, 1PM, 2PM and 4PM.
RSVP: Yes, advance reservations for guided visits required.

Curator Moderated Roundtable Discussion -- Revealed Terrain: The Semantics of Landscape

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, New York, NY 10001

A landscape’s formation within the disciplines of the fine and applied arts is laden with both discernable and veiled artifacts to be unearthed. These foundations are interwoven as interpretative symbols, phonetics, or armatures to synthesize a visual voice and an independent sense of place. In the exhibition Revealed Terrain: The Semantics of Landscape, a visual etymology of environments amid diverse works on paper is constructed. Through acknowledged and unaccustomed definitions within multiple layers and mediums, these formats reassert that the semantics of artistic landscapes are neither concrete nor static. The show includes works by Macy Chadwick, Lesley Dill, Henrik Drescher, William Kentridge, Kiki Smith, Kara Walker, and Christopher Wool, among other artists.



A roundtable discussion will take place Friday, March 4, 6:30pm at the Center for Book Arts, moderated by Guest Curators Cynthia Nourse Thompson and David Charles Chioffi, with Macy Chadwick, Artist; Lesley Dill, Artist; and Sue Gosin, Co-Founder, Dieu Donné. Reception to follow.

6:30PM - 8:30PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Beauty—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
2 East 91st Street, New York, NY 10128

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum will present Beauty—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, the fifth installment of the museum’s popular contemporary design exhibition series, from Feb. 12 through Aug. 21, 2016. With projects ranging from experimental prototypes and interactive games to fashion ensembles and architectural interventions, Beauty will feature work by 63 designers, filling most of two floors of the museum with more than 250 works from around the globe. “Featuring recent work from the most outstanding voices in the global design scene, Beauty will expand the discourse around the transformative power of aesthetic innovation,” said Caroline Baumann, director of the museum. “The exhibition will celebrate design as a creative endeavor that engages the mind, body and senses with works of astonishing form and surprising function.”

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday & Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; Saturday, 10AM – 9PM

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Thom Browne Select

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
2 East 91st Street, New York, NY 10128

For the next installment of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s popular Selects series, fashion designer Thom Browne explores ideas of reflection and individuality with an installation that includes more than 50 of the museum’s historic and contemporary mirrors and frames. Thom Browne Selects, on view in the Nancy and Edwin Marks Collection Gallery March 4–Oct. 2, 2016, is the 13th in the ongoing series in which prominent designers, artists and architects are invited to mine and interpret the museum’s collection of more than 210,000 objects. Known for his meticulous approach to tailoring in men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, Browne reexamines codes of conventional fashion by playing with ideas of uniforms and uniformity while focusing on exceptional materials and craftsmanship. For his Selects  presentation, Browne celebrates the notion of the individual with an immersive, site-specific installation, featuring a wide variety of mirrors and frames from Cooper Hewitt’s collection that are displayed together with some of Browne’s personal items such as a desk, chair, typewriter and coat stand.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday & Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; Saturday, 10AM – 9PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Walter De Maria, The Broken Kilometer (Dia:Soho)

Dia Art Foundation
The Broken Kilometer; 393 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012

The Broken Kilometer, 1979, located at 393 West Broadway in New York City, is composed of 500 highly polished, round, solid brass rods, each measuring two meters in length and five centimeters (two inches) in diameter. The 500 rods are placed in five parallel rows of 100 rods each. The sculpture weighs 18 3/4 tons and would measure 3,280 feet if all the elements were laid end-to-end. Each rod is placed such that the spaces between the rods increase by 5mm with each consecutive space, from front to back; the first two rods of each row are placed 80mm apart, the last two rods are placed 570 mm apart. Metal halide stadium lights illuminate the work which is 45 feet wide and 125 feet long. This work is the companion piece to De Maria's 1977 Vertical Earth Kilometer at Kassel, Germany. In that permanently installed earth sculpture, a brass rod of the same diameter, total weight and total length has been inserted 1,000 meters into the ground. The Broken Kilometer has been on long-term view to the public since 1979. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Exhibition tour of Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact

Museum of the Moving Image
36-01 35 Avenue, Astoria, Queens, NY 11106

The reimagining and recycling of Hollywood iconography in contemporary art, and the way that movies live on in our personal and cultural memories, are explored in the exhibition Walkers: Hollywood Afterlives in Art and Artifact. Organized by independent curator and scholar Robert M. Rubin, the exhibition includes nearly 100 works by 46 artists that dissect, appropriate, and redefine some of the past century’s most iconic films through photography, drawing, sculpture, print, and video. Artists include: Fiona Banner, Pierre Bismuth, Gregory Crewdson, Brice Dellsperger, John Divola, Mark Flood, Douglas Gordon, Alex Israel, Isaac Julien, Agnieszka Kurant, Guy Maddin, Adam McEwen, Kristen Morgin, Yasumasa Morimura, Richard Mosse, Richard Prince, Nicolas Provost, Tom Sachs, Leanne Shapton, John Stezaker, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Ming Wong. Rubin will lead a tour through the exhibition.

4:00PM - 5:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 10:30AM – 5PM; Friday, 10:30AM – 8PM; Sat & Sun, 11:30AM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, to rsvp@movingimage.us

Excerpts from Dapline!

MoCADA
Ingersoll Community Center (177 Myrtle Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11201)

Dapline! Is a dance piece created in collaboration between choreographer André M. Zachery and visual artist LaMont Hamilton. The piece looks at the origins and continued practice of "the DAP" or dapping; the intricate handshakes developed by Black combat troops during the Vietnam War. Listed by the New York Times as "Best Dance of 2015," Dapline! is an invitation to witness the subtle and unspoken conversations between Black men in the United States. This program will present an excerpt of the evening-length work, followed by a Q & A with performers.

7:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday 12PM – 7PM, Thursday 12PM – 8PM, Friday through Saturday 12PM – 7PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, between Broome and Grand

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture is the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create meditative drawings on antique ledger paper. This new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, consists of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form. The second architectural space holds a monumental frieze drawing that is 60 feet x 6 feet. The drawing depicts the relationship between a material form and a subtle body. Also conceptual artist Aaron Taylor Kuffner is presenting his gamelatron, an original instrument created by Kuffner that is a robotic variant of the gamelan.

12:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

NUTRITIONAL FACTS Special Event with artist Emilie Baltz

Radiator Arts
10-61 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11106

Drop by to see food nostalgia during The Armory Show, and join exhibiting artist Emilie Baltz for Nutritional Facts, a wearable edibles performative experience. Emilie will have foodstuffs available for you to realize a bit of your own edible body adornment (Lick Me!!). (Image Credit: Emilie Baltz)

3:00PM - 7:00PM
Institution Hours: Friday and Sunday, 1PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Suzanne McClelland: Articulate Muscle

Dieu Donné
315 West 36th Street, New York, NY 100018

Dieu Donné will present an exhibition of new works in handmade paper and a video projection by Suzanne McClelland. These works were created during the artist's Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné and will be on view from March 2-April 9, 2016.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Tilt Kids Festival

French Institute Alliance Française and French Cultural Services
22 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022

Tilt Kids Festival is a new month-long, citywide festival of the arts for children. Philosophy and music, circus and magic, design, dance, and gastronomy come together in a series of forward-thinking and playful events curated for the audiences of today and tomorrow. The opening weekend (March 4-6) highlights specially conceived projects and performances by renowned contemporary artists, including interactive exhibitions from Ionna Vautrin (FIAF Gallery) and Prune Nourry (The Invisible Dog), as well as new magic from the endless imagination of Rafael Navarro (FIAF, Florence Gould Hall). The Tilt Kids Festival is presented by the French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S.

Institution Hours: Monday through Thursday 8:30AM – 8PM, Friday 8:30AM – 6PM, Saturday 9AM – 5PM
RSVP: Tickets available by Dec 15

Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11AM – 5PM, Saturday 12PM – 5PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Nick Brandt: Inherit the Dust Armory Show Preview

Edwynn Houk Gallery
745 5th Avenue #407, New York, NY 10151

From Thursday, March 3rd- Saturday, March 5th Edwynn Houk Gallery will offer a special preview of Nick Brandt's new exhibition Inherit the Dust for attendees of The Armory Show. For the exhibition Brandt has returned to East Africa to photograph the escalating changes of the continent’s natural world and its animals in a series of epic panoramas. In each location, Brandt erected a life-size panel of one of his animal portrait photographs—showing groups of elephants, rhinos, giraffes, lions, cheetahs and zebras—within sites of explosive urban development in order to demonstrate the displacement of these animals from what was once their natural habitat.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Steffani Jemison and Justin Hicks: Mikrokosmos

NURTUREart
56 Bogart Street (Basement Galleries), Brooklyn, NY 11206

NurtureArt is pleased to present Mikrokosmos, a performance vocabulary by Steffani Jemison and Justin Hicks that uses musical literacy as subject and form. Inspired by diverse approaches to music pedagogy and musical language—the Orff Schulwerk, Curwen hand signs, the artificial pitch-based language of Solresol, and Béla Bartok’s Mikrokosmos piano learning exercises, among others—the work connects visual signs, musical symbols, and real world referents. The event opens Steffani Jemison: Prime, Double Prime, Triple Prime, an exhibition in which transparency and opacity, clarity and code, function as material and metaphor. Mikrokosmos is commissioned by steirischer herbst festival, Graz; it will be deployed in a site-specific performance during the festival that takes place from 23/09 - 16/10/2016 in Graz, Austria. 

7:00PM
Institution Hours:Thursday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Opening Reception: Javier Téllez: To Have Done with the Judgment of God

Koenig & Clinton
459 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011

Please join us for the opening reception of Javier Téllez: To Have Done with the Judgment of God at Koenig & Clinton.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Waterfall Mansion & Gallery and YoungLives

YoungLives
170 E 80th St, New York, NY 10075

An event to pledge support for YoungLives, a network to support and empower teen moms.



For 25 years, YoungLives has been impacting teen moms and shaping generations by carrying hope into their schools, their neighborhoods and their lives, encouraging them to become the women and mothers God created them to be. YoungLives offers practical and spiritual hope through life on life mentoring, and makes the long term investment it takes to see sustainable change.

6:00PM - 9:00PM

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

Abiogenesis, Interactive Loop by Jill Taffet

Harvestworks Digital Media Art Center
596 Broadway, Suite 602, New York, NY 10012

Jill Taffet, Abiogenesis, 2015, Interactive Video Projection

Abiogenesis is inspired by the theory that life can spring from non-living matter. Unique animations follow viewers as they explore and bring biomorphic shapes to life.

Jill Taffet is a moving image artist who creates media installations, video projections and public art projects. She holds a BFA from Cooper Union and a MFA from San Francisco Art Institute. This project was produced in part by the Harvestworks Artist in Residence Program.

7:00PM - 9:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Saturday March 5th

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Exhibition: Po Kim: Abstraction Beyond Borders, 1955-1970

The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery
417 Lafayette Street 4th Floor, New York, NY 10003

The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery will hold the exhibition Po Kim: Abstraction Beyond Borders, 1955-1970, opening March 5, 2016. This is the first major exhibition on the early work of Korean-American artist, Po Kim (1917-2014) in several years and the first in the U.S. to examine Po Kim’s early Abstract Expressionist work. Po Kim emigrated to the U.S. from Korea in 1955, initially spending two years at the University of Illinois on a fellowship. After completing his MFA, the artist moved to New York, where he became immersed in Abstract Expressionism. There, he developed a highly personal and nuanced style of abstraction indebted to Abstract Expressionism while maintaining discernable connections to his cultural heritage. The exhibition includes more than 30 paintings and works on paper by this Korean-American master and will be on view until May 7, 2016.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass, and Plexiglass, before evolving into a material vocabulary that is as revolutionary as his use of various white hues. As such, Ryman’s works are often discussed in relation to Abstract Expressionism as well as Minimalism and Postminimalism. Curated by Courtney J. Martin, Assistant Professor of History of Art & Architecture at Brown University, with Megan Witko, Assistant Curator at Dia, this exhibition builds on Dia’s deep relationship with the artist. Dia presented an exhibition of Ryman’s paintings at the former Dia Center for the Arts in New York City in 1988, and has maintained a long-term presentation of his work at Dia:Beacon since 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Walter De Maria, The Broken Kilometer (Dia:Soho)

Dia Art Foundation
The Broken Kilometer; 393 West Broadway, New York, NY 10012

The Broken Kilometer, 1979, located at 393 West Broadway in New York City, is composed of 500 highly polished, round, solid brass rods, each measuring two meters in length and five centimeters (two inches) in diameter. The 500 rods are placed in five parallel rows of 100 rods each. The sculpture weighs 18 3/4 tons and would measure 3,280 feet if all the elements were laid end-to-end. Each rod is placed such that the spaces between the rods increase by 5mm with each consecutive space, from front to back; the first two rods of each row are placed 80mm apart, the last two rods are placed 570 mm apart. Metal halide stadium lights illuminate the work which is 45 feet wide and 125 feet long. This work is the companion piece to De Maria's 1977 Vertical Earth Kilometer at Kassel, Germany. In that permanently installed earth sculpture, a brass rod of the same diameter, total weight and total length has been inserted 1,000 meters into the ground. The Broken Kilometer has been on long-term view to the public since 1979. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Zoe Beloff, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff

Momenta Art
56 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Zoe Beloff’s The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff takes the form of a room-size installation simulating a mid-twentieth century studio for the production of worker instructional films. The installation reanimates a selection of archival materials, revealing intersections between industrial labor management, the cinematic apparatus, and utopian visions of social progress. Framed by the destitute but determined Mutt and Jeff, a hapless duo of early cartoon characters who go on strike and attempt to animate themselves, the project foregrounds humor and slapstick as means of resisting a regime of highly regulated gestures.



A central three-channel projection sets worker efficiency exercises against documentation of folie à deux (induced or contagious psychosis), exposing ideology at work through repetition and reenactment. This sets off a chain reaction across a series of instructional charts, photographic motion studies, and sculptural objects. What happens when motions become things and take on a life of their own? Beloff’s works mine the unconscious of Fordist mass production to stress erratic rhythms and conflicted affects that endure in contemporary paradigms of work.



The “productive” body is shadowed by its “unproductive” double in Beloff’s installation, which reflects on parallel histories of photography applied to parsing and prescribing movement. Through a montage of institutional films from the mid-twentieth century, the optimized workers of scientific management meet psychiatric patients whose gesticulations are rendered excessive and aberrant. To set these types into dialectical motion, Beloff interlaces the found footage with a series of reenactments by actress Kate Valk. Embodying both female subjects and male analysts in turn through lip-syncing and gestural mimicry, Valk’s performance underscores the camera’s role in both assembly line efficiency and gendered pathologies of hysteria. The film’s shifting tempos and reversals incite an anxious syncopation as a dream world of objects defies its ordered administration. Though it draws on the visual imaginary of an earlier industrial age, The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff speaks as much to the Amazon warehouse workers who fulfill our on-demand orders as it does to the internalized self-management of twenty-first century service labor.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room, 1977. Long-term installation

Dia Art Foundation
141 Wooster St, New York, NY 10012

An interior earth sculpture.

250 cubic yards of earth (197 cubic meters)

3,600 square feet of floor space (335 square meters)

22 inch depth of material (56 centimeters)

Total weight of sculpture: 280,000 lbs. (127,300 kilos)



The New York Earth Room, 1977, is the third Earth Room sculpture executed by the artist, the first being in Munich, Germany in 1968. The second was installed at the Hessisches Landesmuseum in Darmstadt, Germany in 1974. The first two works no longer exist.



The New York Earth Room has been on long-term view to the public since 1980. This work was commissioned and is maintained by Dia Art Foundation. (Photo: John Cliett)

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM (closed from 3 – 3:30PM)
RSVP: No

JEAN PIERRE MULLER 7x7 : COLORBOX & A RED SHOW IN A

WhiteBox Art Space
329 Broome Street, New York. NY 10002

ColorBox and A Red Show in A are the latest works to emerge from Jean Pierre Muller’s innovative 7x7 project. 7x7 is an inter-disciplinary collaboration between Belgian artist Muller and seven musical luminaries from a variety of contemporary genres; Nile Rodgers, Robert Wyatt, Mulatu Astatke, Archie Shepp, Sean O’Hagan, Kassin and Terry Riley. 7x7 is based on the simple principle that the seven colors of the rainbow correspond to the seven notes of the scale, the seven days of the week (and deities and planets associated with those days) and the seven chakras. Seven sound altarpieces have been created, in an edition of seven, each housing an original music by one of the seven composers. A is Red is Monday, Day of the Moon and of Diana (Robert Wyatt), B is Orange is Tuesday, Day of Mars (Archie Shepp), and so on.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

EAF15: Tour, Performance & Closing Reception

Socrates Sculpture Park
32-01 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY 11106

Join Socrates Sculpture Park’s Director of Exhibitions for the final tour of EAF15 before the exhibition closes. EAF15 - the 15th annual Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition - is a cornerstone of the park’s visual arts programming and widely acclaimed for the ambition, breadth, and innovation of the works on view. EAF15 features 15 artists: Kenseth Armstead, Charlotte Becket & Roger Sayre, José Carlos Casado, Torkwase Dyson, Carla Edwards, Davey Hawkins, Lena Henke, David Horvitz, Charlotte Hyzy, Melanie McLain, Kirsten Nelson, Freya Powell, Leah Raintree, Aaron Suggs, and Noa Younse. The director’s tour will culminate with site-specific performances by EAF15 artist Melanie McLain and a closing reception on the waterfront. RSVP is recommended.

1:00PM - 3:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Sunday, 10AM – 6:00PM
RSVP: Recommended (not required), to rsvp@socratessculpturepark.org

SIGNAL

Smack Mellon
92 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

SIGNAL, curated by Alexis Heller, opens at Smack Mellon on March 5 and will be on view through April 17, 2016. This exhibition presents artworks that challenge the gender binary and explore a continuum of self definition. Working in diverse mediums, these eleven contemporary artists utilize code, collaborative representation,fantasy and play to subvert histories that have denied gender variance. They question authorship over 'the natural', make manifest sites of resistance, and reimagine a future where identities are fluid, becoming ad infinitum and celebrated as such.

5:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

N O K - Next Of Kin

Baxter St at the Camera Club of New York
126 Baxter Street, New York, NY 10013

We are delighted to invite you to a panel discussion at BAXTER ST at CCNY on Inbal Abergil's exhibition, N O K (Next Of Kin). With this body of work, Abergil examines private monuments erected among American families of soldiers who have given their lives in the line of duty over the last century and brings us into a larger discussion of war, memory and the lived experience of conflict and trauma. The distinguished panelists are Elisabeth Sherman, Assistant Curator, Whitney Museum; poet and playwright Maurice Emerson Decaul; and Inbal Abergil, photographer. The panel will be moderated by Allen Frame. This event is part of BAXTER ST at CCNY’s Conversations Series and will include the panel discussion followed by a Q&A. The event is free to the public but RSVP is suggested as space is limited.

3:00PM - 5:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 12PM – 6PM

CITYarts Public Art

CITYarts, Inc.
525 Broadway #602, New York, NY 10012

CITYarts will present public murals that have been created by professional artists in collaboration with youth and communities around the five boroughs, as well as mosaic Peace Walls created around the world. The guests will be able to visit our Soho office and view informational videos, original art, and will have the opportunity to purchase special edition prints by artists Vik Muniz, Peter Sis, and Daniel Libeskin. They will also be able to purchase Pieces for Peace artworks created by youth from around the world, a peace book and a book of 300 ornaments for world peace created for the Holiday Tree.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Friday 9:30AM – 5:30PM
RSVP: Yes, to info@cityarts.org

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, between Broome and Grand

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture is the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create meditative drawings on antique ledger paper. This new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, consists of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form. The second architectural space holds a monumental frieze drawing that is 60 feet x 6 feet. The drawing depicts the relationship between a material form and a subtle body. Also conceptual artist Aaron Taylor Kuffner is presenting his gamelatron, an original instrument created by Kuffner that is a robotic variant of the gamelan.

12:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

SETTING OUT GUIDED TOUR AND CLOSING RECEPTION

apexart
291 Church Street, New York, NY 10013

Setting Out is an exhibition that seeks to untangle the terms that motivate and define contemporary expeditions. Organized by Aly Ogasian, Shona Kitchen, and Jennifer Dalton Vincent, the exhibition focuses less on historically-favored territorial explorations, asserting instead that contemporary expeditions now reside within sociological and technological atmospheres. Drawing from legacies of science and art, pursuits of knowledge, as well as from current advancements in technology, the exhibition traces the limits of human understanding. A closing reception will be held at apexart at 4:00pm-6:00pm on March 5th, 2016. A selection of participating artists and curators will be present to offer some closing words about the exhibition. On March 5th, 2016 from 4:00pm-6:00pm, apexart will host a closing reception with guided tours from the exhibition organizers.

4:00PM - 6:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Isamu Noguchi: Functional Ceramics

Noguchi Museum
9-01 33rd Road, Long Island City, NY 11106

In honor of Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, which will include a display of more than 300 of Sachs' handmade porcelain chawan (tea bowls), the Museum will exhibit a selection of Noguchi's more “functional” ceramics: plates, bowls, trays, and other traditional forms—along with other pieces that play with the notion of use value.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday, 10am – 5pm; Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 6pm
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Alyson Shotz

MTA Arts and Design
Smith-9 Street Station, F, G Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Nautical Charts – Gowanus & Red Hook from 1733-1922; Fathom Points + Compass Bearings, a large-scale mixed media installation by Alyson Shotz for the Smith-9 Street Station in Brooklyn.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Cal Lane

MTA Arts and Design
Knickerbocker Avenue Station, M Train

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Digs, a series of steel sculptural panels created by artist and welder Cal Lane.

RSVP: No

Hank Willis Thomas: The Truth Is I See You (Located in MetroTech Commons)

Public Art Fund
Metrotech Commons

Brooklyn is one of the most diversely populated areas in the world, bringing together cultures from all corners of the globe. The Truth Is I See You is part of an ongoing series by Brooklyn-based artist Hank Willis Thomas that explores the nature of truth and understanding across cultures. Using the phrases of a poem written in collaboration with artist Ryan Alexiev, the core of the exhibition is a new series of comic book-inspired speech balloon signs that feature universal statements about truth in 22 of the many languages spoken in Brooklyn. Installed along the MetroTech Promenade, each sign also features an English translation of the phrase and is accompanied by a pronunciation guide. Thomas arrived at these translations by working with an extended network of friends to communicate the essence of each English statement, as opposed to a direct translation. Within the Commons, the speech balloon is repeated in new sculptural works: two benches of rolled steel create circular spaces for contemplation, while a large-scale steel tree has branches that seem to grow into thought bubbles. Together these works invite us to approach our different perspectives on truth with a new sense of understanding.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Xenobia Bailey

MTA Arts and Design
34th Street-Hudson Yards Station, 7 train

Download a free podcast to learn more about Funktional Vibrations, a glass mosaic project by artist Xenobia Bailey for the new 34th Street-Hudson Yards station on the west side of Manhattan.

RSVP: No

Steve McCurry: India

Rubin Museum
150 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011

Steve McCurry: India, co-organized by the Rubin Museum and the International Center of Photography, brings together stunning photographs of India—its people, monuments, landscapes, seasons, and cities—by the renowned photographer Steve McCurry. The exhibition, which is representative of three decades of McCurry’s work, is the first museum presentation to focus on his India photographs and includes some that have never been shown before. A combination of portraits, landscapes, and documentary imagery express McCurry’s curiosity and commitment to capturing unexpected moments. The exhibition opens with images of spiritual life, as well as selections from the series India by Rail, which portray the movement and life surrounding the Indian Railway. Photographs from the Monsoon series depict India’s season of heavy storms that is also synonymous with life, passion, and celebration. Later works capture beautiful landscapes, historical sites, and the life of ordinary people in major cities and rural areas, representative of diverse regions of India. Objects from the Rubin Museum collection of Himalayan art will be thoughtfully selected to complement the photographs on view and to illustrate the connections between ancient and contemporary India.

Institution Hours: Monday & Thursday, 11AM – 5PM; Wednesday, 11AM – 9PM; Friday, 11AM – 10PM; Saturday & Sunday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Collected By Thea Westreich Wagner And Ethan Wagner

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Co-organized by the Whitney and the Centre Pompidou and composed of selections from the noted Collection of Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, this exhibition celebrates American and international work from the 1960s to the present day. Featuring renowned pieces by, among many others, Diane Arbus, Robert Gober, Jeff Koons, Sherrie Levine, Richard Prince, and Christopher Wool, the exhibition will also include recent work by artists such as Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Laura Owens, Frances Stark, and Bernadette Corporation. Of the 800 works included in the gift from Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, 550 will enter the Whitney’s permanent collection, and approximately 300 will become part of the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner is organized by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, Whitney Museum of American Art, and Christine Macel, chief curator and head of the department of contemporary and prospective creation, Centre Pompidou, with Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, Whitney Museum of American Art.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Flatlands

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

This exhibition brings together paintings by five artists—Nina Chanel Abney, Mathew Cerletty, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Caitlin Keogh, and Orion Martin. Highlighting an engagement with representation among some emerging artists, the works in this group conjure a sense of space that is dimensionless and airless, like the illusionistic scenery flats used on stage and movie sets. Each of these artists fills their compositions with objects, bodies and places that are based on reality, yet are exaggerated, recontextualized, simplified or flattened. The individual works are imbued with both the uncertainty of our sociopolitical moment as well as the seductive quality of consumerism and physical attraction. The paintings in Flatlands invite the viewer to reflect on this ever-present polarity and ambivalence of contemporary life.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Njideka Akunyili Crosby: Before Now After (Mama, Mummy And Mamma) 

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Over the course of the next five years, a series of public art installations by key American artists will appear across from the Whitney’s new building and the southern entrance to the High Line, on the facade of 95 Horatio Street. Njideka Akunyili Crosby is the third artist to present work as part of the series, which was initiated by the Whitney in partnership with TF Cornerstone and the High Line. This is the artist’s first solo presentation in an institution in New York. Njideka Akunyili Crosby (b. 1983; Enugu, Nigeria) is a Los-Angeles based artist who makes large-scale, representational work that combines collage, drawing, painting, and printmaking. Her work routinely fuses both Nigerian and American influences and source material, reflecting on contemporary African life (often her family) along with her experience as an expatriate living in the U.S., and the inherent difficulty of navigating these two realms. The works simultaneously become intimate while more broadly exploring the cultural complications of the dual worlds that she inhabits.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30AM – 6PM, extended hours Friday & Saturday to 10PM
RSVP: No

Ebony G. Patterson: Dead Treez

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Dead Treez is the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson, who splits her time between Kingston, Jamaica and Lexington, KY. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race and the media. Her highly adorned, almost illuminated images and objects are intended to attract and seduce the viewers, challenging them to look closer. For Dead Treez, Patterson assembled five eye-popping tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of ten male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. Her tapestries depict murder victims, as sourced through social media, embellished to seduce viewers into witnessing the underreported brutality experienced by those on the lower rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop)

Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Featuring the work of three filmmakers, Denis Côté (Montreal), Daniel Eisenberg (Chicago) and Andreas Bunte (Berlin), In Time (The Rhythm of the Workshop) turns the camera lens on industrial manufacturing and ways that material, bodies and value are shaped by those processes. Throughout all three films the complex interdependencies that are required between humans and tools, tools and objects, objects and humans, and all parties and the marketplace are depicted and build on one another through a shared “melody” across the soundtracks. The films are punctuated by Varvara & Mar’s (Tallinn/Barcelona) Speed of Markets, an installation of seven metronomes set to follow and translate into rhythm the real-time trade volume of the stock-markets. In Time allows for a meditation on the choreography of fabrication, the transference of energy, the dignity of labor, and the unexpected ways material becomes immaterial. Looking slowly and closely, all three filmmakers construct films that are spare and elegant considerations of manufacturing, even as they attempt to capture the ideological climate of those workshops. The result is a group of time-based labor portraits.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday & Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Jill Baroff: In A Grove

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1040 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

In A Grove refers both to the site where the material come from, as well as to a short story by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, adapted by Akira Kurosawa in the film Rashomon, in which multiple eye-witness testimony of an event contains conflicting information. In Baroff’s installation, the top surface of each trunk has been routed by hand to create grooves, which channel light and capture shadow and has been painted with a single color. in a grove is a monochrome project that is perceived as intensely multi-colored. The viewer becomes the pin around which visual phenomena pivots.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works

Bronx Museum of the Arts
1041 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10456

Stuart has explored and excelled at a photographic output composed of images that are often presented in the form of large grids; these works are combinatory and eclectic. Most photographs have been taken by Stuart herself, in addition to others she culled from sources including the internet and television. Nearly all she has further manipulated and transformed in unique processes the artist has developed herself. Images are combined into remarkable gridded fields rich with abundant correspondences and connections. The element of time is essential, with matrices conflating present and past, recent and ancient history, intimate personal memory and sweeping cultural events.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Agitprop!

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

Agitprop! connects contemporary art devoted to social change with historic moments in creative activism, highlighting activities that seek to motivate broad and diverse publics. Exploring the complexity, range, and impact of these artistic practices—including photography, film, prints, banners, street actions, songs, digital files, and web platforms—the exhibition expands over its run within a unique and dynamic framework. It opens with works by twenty contemporary artists responding to urgent issues of the day, in dialogue with five historical case studies. In the following months, two more waves of contemporary work are being added—on February 17 and April 6, 2016—with each wave of artists choosing those in the next.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

For 150 years, Coney Island has lured artists as a microcosm and icon of American culture. Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861–2008 is the first major exhibition to explore the kaleidoscopic visual record they created, documenting the historic destination’s beginnings as a watering hole for the wealthy, its transformation into a popular beach resort and amusement mecca, its decades of urban decline culminating in the closing of Astroland, and its recent revival as a vibrant and growing community.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238

This site-specific installation by artist Stephen Powers recalls the birth of new public art in Coney Island, and the emergence of a uniquely American and wholly “Coney Island” style of painting. As a longtime admirer of the fading craft of sign painting, Powers has revitalized the tradition of colorful, hand-painted signage and advertisements in an age of digitization. In his work, he uses logotypes that have a superficially commercial look, combining them with his own text to create enigmatic meanings that deliver an emotional punch. Powers transforms our Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Gallery into an immersive environment filled with paintings and signs created in the visual vernacular of the iconic seaside community. This is the newest and ninth iteration of his ICY SIGNS, a traveling sign shop he first conceived in Coney Island in 2003.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario

MTA Arts and Design
Prince Street Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Carrying On, a delightful mixed media installation by artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario, along the platform walls of the Prince Street Station in SoHo.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – James Carpenter, Fulton Center

MTA Arts and Design
Fulton Center, 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, Z, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Sky Reflector-Net, a ground-breaking sculpture designed for Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. Sky Reflector-Net is an integrated work by James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), Grimshaw Architects and Arup Associates.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Leo Villareal

MTA Arts and Design
Bleecker Street/Lafayette Street Station, 6, B, D, F, M Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Hive (Bleecker Street), an LED installation for the Bleecker Street Station by Leo Villareal.

RSVP: No

Eva Kot’átková: ERROR

International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP)
1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 11211

For her exhibition subtitled ERROR, Eva Kot’átková will delve into the ways that institutional contexts impact mental health, and unravel stories about “outsider art” made by psychiatric patients. The presentation will include a new video work filmed on the grounds of the Bohnice Psychiatric Hospital in Prague, which documents the artist’s tableaux vivants—a series of live performances with 50 participants. The video aims to deconstruct the role of biography in the work of mentally ill artists. In addition, Kot’átková will show commissioned sculptural assemblages and drawings that reference outmoded medical equipment that was once used to integrate psychiatric patients into society. Kot’átková’s practice shows how behaviors and habits are performed in social space, often with the participation of audience members. Her work is underlined by the relationship between human beings and objects, and questions the normative systems of institutions such as schools and hospitals. This exhibition is curated by Kari Conte, Director of Programs and Exhibitions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Friday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Suzanne McClelland: Articulate Muscle

Dieu Donné
315 West 36th Street, New York, NY 100018

Dieu Donné will present an exhibition of new works in handmade paper and a video projection by Suzanne McClelland. These works were created during the artist's Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné and will be on view from March 2-April 9, 2016.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Shinique Smith

MTA Arts and Design
Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot, Harlem

Download a free podcast to learn more about Mother Hale’s Garden, Shinique Smith’s mosaic and glass artwork located on the façade and windows of the new Mother Clara Hale Bus Depot in Central Harlem.

RSVP: No

A Constellation

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

A Constellation traces connections among twenty-six artists of African descent: eight who emerged in the mid- to late twentieth century, and who are represented in the exhibition by works from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection, and eighteen younger artists whose works are being shown at the Studio Museum for the first time. The works in the Museum’s collection serve as material and conceptual anchors exploring themes of the figure, formal abstraction, economy, African diasporic history and materiality. The newer works expand on these themes and prompt an intergenerational dialogue in visual space. The artists in the exhibition embrace a broad range of conceptual approaches. Some employ making as a form of politics, others explore how race and cultural production affect aesthetics, while still others combine these methods or create their own. Together the works function as a “constellation,” both as a metaphor for stars that form a pattern, and as a representation of a gathering of dynamic, kindred artists. As suggested by the title, the connections drawn here present just one possible combination among an infinite variety of configurations.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Black: Color, Material, Concept

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Black: Color, Material, Concept presents works that explore the ways that modern and contemporary artists of African descent consider the possibilities of “black” through their choice of media, their imagery and the ideas they bring to their work. As an element of art and design, “black” can have amazingly rich gradation of tones and depths. As a word, it a single syllable that can fill columns in a dictionary. As a social construction, it is one of the most highly charged and proudly asserted realities in American life. The exhibition includes more than two dozen paintings, sculptures and prints, drawn primarily from the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. The artists represented in the exhibition range from modernist elders such as Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten, to a mid-century generation that includes Kerry James Marshall, Glenn Ligon, Leonardo Drew, and Nari Ward, to artists who came of age in the post-Civil Rights era, such as Kara Walker, Noah Davis and Kameelah Janan Rasheed.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Marc Andre Robinson: Twice Told

The Studio Museum in Harlem
144 West 125th Street, New York, NY 10027

Brooklyn-based artist Marc Andre Robinson (b.1972) is known for sculptures that engage his long-standing interests in the history and culture of African Americans. Composed of the back legs of chairs and suspended from the ceiling, Twice Told forms a winding path of symmetrical lines. Robinson uses traditional carpentry techniques to formally and conceptually explore American history through a contemporary lens. Specifically, Robinson considers the legacy of African-American oppression in American society and its contemporary counterpart in ongoing social rights issues.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 9PM; Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Endless House considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways. The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Austrian American artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler's decades-long project a reference for generations to come. Work by architects and artists spanning more than seven decades is exhibited alongside materials from Kiesler’s Endless House design and images of its presentation in MoMA’s 1960 Visionary Architecture exhibition. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radi and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, and Rachel Whiteread. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

This exhibition offers a concise but detailed survey of the work of Jackson Pollock (American, 1912–1956). It tracks his artistic evolution from the 1930s and early 1940s, when he made loosely figurative images based on mythical or primeval themes, to the late 1940s and early 1950s, when he pioneered the radical abstractions for which he is best known by pouring and dripping paint onto canvas or paper. The exhibition features approximately 50 works—paintings, drawings, and prints—from the Museum’s collection, which is unparalleled in the breadth, depth, and quality of its Pollock holdings. Among the paintings on view is One: Number 31, 1950 (1950), arguably Pollock’s greatest masterpiece, and one of his largest canvases. Exceedingly rare and little-known engravings, lithographs, screenprints, and drawings are also included, highlighting an underappreciated side of one of the most important and influential American artists of the 20th century. By bringing together works made using a range of materials and techniques—both traditional and unorthodox—the exhibition underscores the relentless experimentation and emphasis on process that was at the heart of Pollock’s creativity.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Marcel Broodthaers: A Retrospective

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976) worked primarily as a poet until the age of 40, when he turned to the visual arts. Over the next 12 years, his work retained a poetic quality and a sense of humor that balanced its conceptual framework; for his first solo exhibition, he encased unsold copies of his latest poetry book, Pense-Bête (Memory aid, 1964), in plaster, turning them into a sculpture. Broodthaers continued to invent ways to give material form to language while working across mediums—poetry, sculpture, painting, artist’s books, printmaking, and film. From 1968 to 1972, he operated the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), a traveling museum dedicated not to his work as an artist but to the role of the institution itself and the function of art in society. In the final years of his life, Broodthaers created immersive “décors,” large-scale displays in which examples of his past work were often unified with objects borrowed for the occasion. This exhibition—the first Broodthaers retrospective organized in New York—will reunite key works from all aspects of his art making to underscore the complex trajectory of his career, which despite its brief duration proved enormously influential to future generations of artists.

Institution Hours: Monday – Sunday, 10:30AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Anri Sala: Answer Me

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In February 2016, the New Museum presents a major exhibition of the work of Anri Sala (b. 1974), one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge in recent decades. The exhibition marks the most comprehensive survey of his work in the United States to date. Highlighting Sala’s continuing interest in how sound and music can engage architecture and history, Anri Sala: Answer Me features extensive multichannel audio and video installations that unfold across the Second, Third, and Fourth Floor galleries, composing a symphonic experience specific to the New Museum. In his early video works from the late 1990s, Sala used documentary strategies to examine life after communism in his native Albania, observing the role of language and memory in narrating social and political histories. Since the early 2000s, his video works have probed the psychological effects of acoustic experiences, embracing both music and sound as languages capable of conjuring up images, rousing nostalgia, and communicating emotions. In subtle visual narratives, Sala often depicts what appear to be fragments of everyday life, and his intimate observations experiment with fiction to double as enigmatic portraits of society.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Cheryl Donegan: Scenes and Commercials

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

Working across video, painting, and performance, Cheryl Donegan (b. 1962, New Haven, CT) explores the production and consumption of images in mass culture, middlebrow design, and art history. In her performance and video work spanning the early ’90s to the early ’00s, Donegan often used her body as an apparatus for mark-making, parodying the conventions of commercials and music videos while considering the politics of self-representation. Over the last decade, she has continued her exploration of the mediated image and her interests in surface, compressed space, and the indexical relation of the mark to the body in paintings and sculptures produced in her studio as well as in videos distributed on social media. Her New Museum residency and exhibition on the Fifth Floor will be presented as part of the Education and Public Engagement Department’s R&D Season: LEGACY and will tackle the ways and means by which our connections to the past are produced, fabricated, and renewed, particularly in fashion and art history. Donegan will present works from throughout her career, bringing together key projects that have been generative of new pieces in her oeuvre. She will also premiere EXTRA LAYER, a collection of outerwear produced in cooperation with Print All Over Me, which will be unveiled in a fashion show at the New Museum in early April 2016. Throughout the run of the exhibition, the Resource Center will serve as a concept store that will display garments, drawings, prints, and textiles Donegan has produced alongside items she has sourced from websites such as eBay, engaging in a process of “refashioning the readymade.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Pia Camil: A Pot for a Latch

New Museum
235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

In January 2016, the New Museum will host the first solo museum presentation in New York of the work of artist Pia Camil. In her paintings, sculptures, performances, and installations, Camil draws inspiration from the inner-city landscape of her native Mexico City and from the history of modernism. Her projects expose the inherent problems as well as the latent possibilities within urban ruin, exploring what she refers to as the “aesthetization of failure.” For her Espectaculares series (2012–ongoing) she hand-dyes and stitches together fabric to create curtains inspired by the abandoned commercial billboards that are ubiquitous in Mexico City, transforming the remnants of a dysfunctional commercial culture into theatrical environments. Recent projects such as Entrecortinas: Abre, Jala, Corre (2014) expand the scope of her practice to incorporate ceramic vessels and structural elements that invite the viewer to navigate through the exhibition space and experience shifting viewpoints and juxtapositions.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 9PM
RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Duke Riley

MTA Arts and Design
Beach 98 Street Station, A, S Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Be Good or Be Gone, a vibrant faceted glass work installed at the Beach 98 Street station in Rockaway, Queens. Artist Duke Riley has long been interested in maritime history, folklore, and local customs - particularly around New York's waterways.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Ellen Harvey

MTA Arts and Design
Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station, Metro-North Railroad

Download a free podcast to learn more about The Home of the Stars, a series of mosaic panels created by artist Ellen Harvey that grace the walls of the pedestrian overpass of Metro-North Railroad's Yankees-E. 153rd Street Station at in the Bronx.

RSVP: No

MTA Arts & Design – Vito Acconci

MTA Arts and Design
161st Street-Yankee Stadium Station, N, R Trains

Download a free podcast to learn more about Wall-Slide, a mixed media installation by artists Vito Acconci, throughout the station complex at the 161st Street-Yankee Stadium.

RSVP: No

Greater New York

Museum of Modern Art PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of its landmark exhibition series, begun as a collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art in 2000. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Greater New York arrives in a city and art community that has changed significantly since the first version of the survey. With the rise of a robust commercial art market and the proliferation of art fairs, opportunities for younger artists in the city have grown alongside a burgeoning interest in artists who may have been overlooked in the art histories of their time. Concurrently, the city itself is being reshaped by a voracious real estate market that poses particular challenges to local artists. The speed of this change in recent years has stoked a nostalgia for earlier periods in New York—notably the 1970s and 1980s, and the experimental practices and attitudes that flourished in the city during those decades. Against this backdrop, Greater New York departs from the show’s traditional focus on youth, instead examining points of connection and tension between our desire for the new and nostalgia for that which it displaces. Bringing together emerging and more established artists, the exhibition occupies MoMA PS1’s entire building with over 400 works by 157 artists, including programs of film and performance. Greater New York is co-organized by a team led by Peter Eleey, Curator and Associate Director of Exhibitions and Programs, MoMA PS1; and including art historian Douglas Crimp, University of Rochester; Thomas J. Lax, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA; and Mia Locks, Assistant Curator, MoMA PS1.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Bearing Witness: Drawings by William Gropper

Queens Museum
New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, NY 11368

Printmaker, painter and visual editorialist, William Gropper (1897-1977), spent six decades bearing witness. Growing up in poverty on the Lower East Side, Gropper learned early about social injustice. He dropped out of school to work in the sweatshops but found respite in drawing and studied with Robert Henri and George Bellows. Gropper’s aunt was a victim of 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which further radicalized his thinking. Along with his study of artists who came before him, it was the graphic works of Goya and Daumier that helped solidify his direction as an artist. From 1915-1935, Gropper held staff positions on various publications, from Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, the New York Tribune and Smart Set, to leftist papers such as the New Masses, The Nation and the Sunday Worker. Incredibly prolific, for the Yiddish Freiheit alone, over an eleven year period Gropper created thousands of political cartoons.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 12PM – 6PM / After April 1st hours will change to Thursday through Monday 11AM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Discount Admission to the Children’s Museum of the Arts

Children’s Museum of the Arts
103 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10009

Visit the Children’s Museum of the Arts and enjoy Sew What?, an exhibition taking textile as its starting point, and a wide variety of hands-on art making workshops for ages 1-15 led by our staff practicing Teaching Artists. During Armory Arts Week, enjoy $2 off general admission (normally $12 for ages 1-65)! Sew What?, on view February 2-May 22, 2016, revels in the diversity of not only textiles itself, but how these materials are transformed through various techniques and includes work by Louise Bourgeois, Adrian Esparza, Eliza Kentridge, Larissa Mellor, Timothy Paul Myers, Sheila Pepe, Robb Putnam, Alicia Scardetta, Susan Beallor-Snyder, and Nathan Vincent. *To redeem this offer, please mention Armory Arts Week Discount at the front desk when purchasing admission. Offer valid February 29-March 6, 2016.

Institution Hours: Thursday & Friday, 12PM – 6PM; Saturday & Sunday, 10AM – 5PM; Monday, 12PM – 5PM
RSVP: No

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Jennifer Bartlett: Hospital is the first museum exhibition of this new series of ten pastels made in 2012. The works are based on a series of photographs that Bartlett took during an extended stay at Greenberg Pavilion at New York-Presbyterian Hospital / Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, and which she later cropped and edited in her studio. Bartlett has included pastels in other large-scale serial works like In the Garden (1980) and Air: 24 Hours (1991–92). As well, pastels have acted as a sort of travelogue for Bartlett, with various series referencing places she has lived in or traveled to, including: Cape Cod, Bermuda, Aspen, Iceland, Mayeaux Island, Sun Valley, Amagansett, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. With Hospital, Bartlett continues her long-established practice of close observation and responsiveness to her environment, but this time turns her attention to interior spaces and window views rather than landscapes, gardens, and atmospheric conditions. The drawings mine the liminal experience of "hospital time," characterized by long periods of waiting interspersed with highly organized routines of treatment, medication, and physical therapy. This combination of boredom and activity often heightens one's awareness of details, and Bartlett exploits these sensations to create images that eschew sentimentality while remaining indelibly poignant.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Louise Despont: Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture will be the first solo museum exhibition for Louise Despont, an artist best known for using compasses, stencils, and rulers to create intricate and deeply meditative drawings on ledger paper. For Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture, The Drawing Center has commissioned a new site-specific architectural installation and several series of large-scale drawings that have been influenced by Despont’s recent relocation to Bali. The first architectural enclosure on view, entitled Pure Potential, will consist of a wooden façade covered by wooden dowels that create a textured and protective surface. For Despont, the series of eight Pure Potential drawings represent the transition of energy from formlessness into form.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Please Make This Look Nice

The Drawing Center
35 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10013

For Please Make This Look Nice: The Graphic Design Process as an Act of Drawing a simulated studio will be installed in The Drawing Center’s Lab gallery. Throughout the course of the show, a select group of professionals from throughout New York’s vibrant graphic design community will be invited to work on unique and original design assignments and in a variety of formats and media including typography, logos, books, posters, motion, editorial, and more. All work will be printed, displayed, and projected for the exhibition audience to view, discuss, and engage with directly. This exhibition looks to expand the general and most basic understand of graphic design by turning attention away from finished design solutions—the “what” of graphic design—to consider the “how” and “why,” focusing on the myriad techniques and methodologies involved in the graphic design process, including writing, traditional drawing, photography, prototyping, assemblage, collage, and collecting. Rather than pointing to individual pieces in a designer’s archive as specific works of “process drawing,” Please Make This Look Nice considers the whole graphic design process itself as an act of drawing. As Milton Glaser explains in an interview for the related publication: “Drawing is a feedback mechanism to adjust your thinking. It’s a way of seeing whether what you’re thinking can become manifest.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Now Showing: Jessi Reaves

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce Now Showing: Jessi Reaves. Now Showing is a program that highlights a single artwork or project in areas throughout SculptureCenter's building and is an exploratory and flexible mode for presenting artworks and projects to our audiences. Operating as both furniture and sculpture, New York-based Jessi Reaves's unique sofas, tables, shelving, and other functional objects often look as if they have been turned inside out. The elements that are normally concealed or inside—such as foam cushions, stains, hardware, plywood, and other structural supports—instead become the primary textures and shapes for her works. In her pieces, the utilitarian and decorative aspects of furniture are recombined into new compositions that create their own logic and reveal their biography as a thing. For Now Showing, Reaves will present a chair and ottoman set, an artwork as well as a comfortable seat.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Rochelle Goldberg: The Plastic Thirsty

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the first solo institutional exhibition by Rochelle Goldberg. Born in Vancouver, Canada, she is currently based in New York City. Goldberg stages sculptural topographies composed of living, ephemeral, and synthetic materials, such as crude oil and chia seeds, in combination with ceramic and steel. Transformation is enacted through her continuously evolving terrains, and further represented through the hybrid impressions of synthetic snakeskin and fingerprints. Molting and shape shifting, Goldberg's work challenges the fixity of the art object. For her exhibition at SculptureCenter, Goldberg is hand rendering human-scaled sculptures in ceramic and steel that are evocative of hybrid fish forms and other motifs, enacting a psychological narrative around our post-industrial age.

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Eccentrics

SculptureCenter
44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

A mode of popular entertainment that links ancient and modern technologies, the structural, emotional, and cognitive effects of the circus operate as an abstract framework for this group exhibition and performance program.

Featuring: Sanya Kantarovsky, Adriana Lara, Ieva Misevi_i_t_, Eduardo Navarro, Jeanine Oleson, Georgia Sagri, Zhou Tao, and Tori Wrånes

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Beyond Credit

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

Art in General is pleased to announce the inaugural exhibition at its new ground floor gallery at 145 Plymouth Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn, opening on January 30th, 2016. The exhibition Beyond Credit is presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi, Georgia, as part of Art in General’s acclaimed International Collaborations program. This exhibition features the work of five Georgian artists who are highly regarded internationally but relatively unknown in the United States. Beyond Credit seeks to explore the artist’s process, as a mixture of modes involving rational thinking, intuition, contradiction, accident, mistake, and absurdity, all of which serve as the building blocks for not only their artistic practices, but also their lives. The show aims to investigate the artist’s condition as one who is trained as a “professional creative,” and how that creativity often infuses the habits, structure, and trajectory of their individual paths. What does it mean to live a life in a state of unbroken creativity, detecting inspiration and art everywhere and at all times? The notion of “credit” in this context suggests the status and position of artists in relation to over commercialized and monetized aspects of art as products. Beyond Credit attempts to not only present finished pieces authored by the five artists on view, but rather to show evidence of five lives as the result of their ongoing creative processes, and to consider these lives as continuous, unfolding artworks themselves.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Tilt Kids Festival

French Institute Alliance Française and French Cultural Services
22 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022

Tilt Kids Festival is a new month-long, citywide festival of the arts for children. Philosophy and music, circus and magic, design, dance, and gastronomy come together in a series of forward-thinking and playful events curated for the audiences of today and tomorrow. The opening weekend (March 4-6) highlights specially conceived projects and performances by renowned contemporary artists, including interactive exhibitions from Ionna Vautrin (FIAF Gallery) and Prune Nourry (The Invisible Dog), as well as new magic from the endless imagination of Rafael Navarro (FIAF, Florence Gould Hall). The Tilt Kids Festival is presented by the French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S.

Institution Hours: Monday through Thursday 8:30AM – 8PM, Friday 8:30AM – 6PM, Saturday 9AM – 5PM
RSVP: Tickets available by Dec 15

Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021

With over thirty Kamkura period (1185–1333) masterpieces from private and museum collections in North America and Europe, Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan is the first exhibition to look beyond the aesthetics and technical achievements of these remarkable sculptures, and specifically examine the relationship between realism and the sacred empowerment of the objects. The exhibition explores how sculptures are “brought to life” or “enlivened” by the spiritual connection between exterior form, interior contents, and devotional practice, reflecting the complexity and pluralism of the period. Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan marks the first major loan show of Kamakura sculpture in the United States in more than thirty years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM; extended hours Friday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Joiri Minaya: Redecode

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

Redecode: A tropical theme is a great way to create a fresh, peaceful, relaxing atmosphere is derived from two wallpapers designed in the 1940’s for sumptuous redecorations in luxurious hotels in the United States. Recalling scientific illustrations, the original patterns belong to a style popularized at midcentury. Names such as “Brazilliance,” designed for the Greenbrier Hotel in West Virginia by Dorothy Draper, and “Martinique Banana Leaf,” designed for the Beverly Hills Hotel by Don Loper allude to their relationship to tropical landscapes. This stylistic interest coincides with the peak period of U.S. interventions into Latin America and the Caribbean. These designs and their names offer a way to explore some of the constructed notions of fantasy, exoticism, pleasure, domestication, and consumerism associated with the tropical landscape and its subjects that still prevail today.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

The Illusive Eye

El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029

The Illusive Eye is an international survey of Op and kinetic art. El Museo del Barrio is organizing this exhibition in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the MoMA’s 1965 groundbreaking display, The Responsive Eye. The MoMA exhibition explored variations on optical art, geometric abstraction, and kinetic art. These modes of art were widely embraced and highly developed in Latin America in the 1960s. Our exhibition therefore takes a Latin American perspective on an international phenomenon. Latin American countries represented in The Illusive Eye include Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, the United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela—among other nations. The Illusive Eye embarks on three objectives: First, we revisit and celebrate the innovations of the MoMA exhibition and flesh it out with the Latin American dimension that it lacked. Second, we put forth a notably different reading of Op and kinetic art—offering a discursive and critical response to the traditional studies dwelling on the physiology and psychology of vision. Third, we propose a connection between the naturalizing (responsive) theories of optical art and the naturalized absence of Latin American artists from The Responsive Eye and similar curatorial projects. The few Latin Americans represented in the MoMA show each lived in Europe at the time of the exhibition. We therefore propose a link between the lessons in the phenomenology of illusions in Op art and the parallel illusions of curatorial vision—in which focus on one object requires the invisibility of others.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Unorthodox

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This November, the Jewish Museum will present Unorthodox, a large-scale group exhibition featuring over 50 contemporary artists from around the world whose practices mix forms and genres without concern for artistic conventions. Though the artists in Unorthodox come from a wide variety of backgrounds and generations, they are united in their spirit of independence and individuality. Through over 200 works, the exhibition will highlight the importance of iconoclasm and art’s key role in breaking rules and traditions. Numerous works that examine social and political values, religion and humanism, trauma, and identity explore the relationship between the human figure and the modern creative process. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Using Walls, Floors, and Ceilings: Valeska Soares

The Jewish Museum
1109 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum’s exhibition series bringing site-specific works of art to the Museum’s main lobby continues this fall with artist Valeska Soares Time Has No Shadows (2015), a work that attempts to give form to the passage of time and connect its ungraspable infiniteness with the slipperiness of language and the instability of meaning. Soares’s artworks are often assembled from antiques and used materials, like those included in this work. This process of recirculation gives new life to the discarded and disused, and adds to the stories accumulated across their scratched and faded surfaces. In Time Has No Shadows, poetic texts are placed on the carpet in a spiral shape, with a subtly-altered antique pocket watch hanging above each text. These revisions and alterations add yet another layer to the enigmatic histories of these timeworn items, inviting visitors to contemplate their own narratives for the installation and the objects within it. 50% off Jewish Museum admission for anyone mentioning Armory Arts Week or The Armory Show February 29 – March 6, excluding Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Institution Hours: Saturday through Tuesday, 11AM – 5:45PM; Friday 11AM– 4PM; extended hours Thursday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Alex Katz at the Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This exhibition, mounted in celebration of gifts both donated and promised to the Met, gathers works by Alex Katz (American, born 1927), one of our era's most acclaimed artists. Acquired through the generosity of Glenn Fuhrman, Leonard A. Lauder, and Katz himself, these works—eight in total, including two loans—span nearly the entire arc of Katz's career and include drawings, prints, and paintings. Among the works are two cutouts, the innovative artistic device that Katz pioneered in the late 1950s; a haunting cityscape; several portraits of Ada, Katz's wife and long-time muse; and portraits of luminaries from Katz's own social and artistic circles. Katz was born in Brooklyn in 1927 and came of age as an artist during the heyday of the New York School. In the late 1950s, he began to develop his mature style, one characterized by elegance, simplicity, and stylized abstraction. Committed to depicting recognizable motifs, Katz minimizes details and shading, choosing instead to summarize his subjects with the help of bold contours, blocks of color, and strategic swipes of the brush. As much as they represent a specific person or place, Katz's works also depict the act of seeing itself—that is, the peculiar mechanics of viewing, whether from afar or close up, whether on an empty street or across a crowded room. He captures the surprise and suspense, the desire and pleasure, that accompany the experience of spectatorship.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

This installation, the thirteenth since the Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography opened in 2007, is a snapshot—not comprehensive, but representative—of the collecting interests of the Department of Photographs through recently acquired works made by fifteen artists over the last seven years. While the title is taken from a photograph in the exhibition, the concept of reconstruction chimes with many of the works, which can be viewed, at least in part, as indirect addresses to how perception and cognition are being remapped to accommodate our newly bifurcated existences—online and "in real life." The notion that we swim in a sea of photographic images that shape how we see ourselves and the world felt new in 1989 and prescient in 1968, but with the rise of the Internet and social media, this condition is so obvious as to be useless. With one foot in cyberspace and the other on an unstable terrain of accelerated change, our daily life and deepest subjective recesses—our relationship to ourselves, each other, and to things—is constantly being reconstructed along digital lines, with cameras serving as almost bodily appendages to interface between these two realities. In this context, the seamless digital “restoration” of dazzle camouflage to a WWII battleship, the viral spread of Photoshop mishaps in an interior view, or the simple folding back of a book page can be seen as complex negotiations between the old order and the new networks that silently and invisibly are shaping individual and collective experience.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM– 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

The Aftermath of Conflict: Jo Ractliffe's Photographs of Angola and South Africa

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Throughout her career, South African photographer Jo Ractliffe (born 1961) has directed her camera toward landscapes to address themes of displacement, conflict, history, memory, and erasure. This exhibition brings together selected works from three of her recent photographic series that focus on the aftermath of the Angolan Civil War (1975–2002) and its relationship with the Border War (1966–89) fought by South Africans in Angola and present-day Namibia. For Ractliffe and many other South African civilians, Angola during these wars was an abstract place, a "secret, unspoken location where brothers and boyfriends were sent as part of their military service." When seen consecutively, these three series reveal Ractliffe's deepening engagement with the region's complex histories as an attempt to "retrieve a place for memory." The earliest series, Terreno Ocupado (2007–8), was produced during Ractliffe's first visit to Angola's capital, Luanda, five years after the end of the Civil War. These images highlight the structural instability of the capital's shantytowns and question what it means for land to be occupied, abandoned, and struggled over. While working on As Terras do Fim do Mundo (2009–10), Ractliffe traveled alongside ex-soldiers returning to the desolate places in the Angolan countryside where they had fought. The Borderlands (2011–13) examines the impact of the wars in Angola within South Africa's borders. For this most recent project, she photographed militarized landscapes that had been occupied by the South African army, tracing histories of displacement that began during the colonial and apartheid periods and continue to unfold today.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Thursday, 10AM – 5:30PM; extended hours Friday & Saturday to 9PM
RSVP: No

Munch and Expressionism

Neue Galerie
1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028

On February 18, 2016, Neue Galerie New York will open Munch and Expressionism, an exhibition that examines Edvard Munch’s influence on his German and Austrian contemporaries, as well as their influence upon him. The show will offer a compelling new look at works by the Norwegian artist, whose painting The Scream has become a symbol of modern angst. The Neue Galerie is the sole venue for the exhibition, where it will be on view through June 13, 2016. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Dr. Jill Lloyd, has been organized in tandem with Munch specialist Dr. Reinhold Heller. Dr. Lloyd has assembled several important exhibitions for the Neue Galerie, including Van Gogh and Expressionism in 2007 and Ferdinand Hodler: View to Infinity in 2012. As an independent art historian, she has also curated exhibitions at the Tate, the Royal Academy in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. She has written extensively on Expressionist art. (Image Credit: Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895. Private Collection © 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Institution Hours: Thursday through Monday 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

For more than three decades, Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) collaborated to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. In particular it will establish a sustained dialogue between Fischli and Weiss’s work with the moving image and their sculptural practice, with signature projects like Suddenly This Overview (1981– ), hundreds of unfired clay sculptures that pillory established truths and myths alike, and The Way Things Go (1987), an inane filmic study of causational activity, appearing along the museum’s ramps. The exhibition will further consider Fischli and Weiss’s extended meditations on the banality of existence, with key objects from virtually every body of work within their oeuvre, including Sausage Series (1979); Equilibres (Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86); Grey Sculptures (1984–86/2006–08); Rubber Sculptures (1986–90/2005–06); Visible World (1986–2012); Airports (1987–2012); Polyurethane Installations (1991– ); Question Projections (2000–2003); Fotografías (2005); and Walls, Corners, Tubes (2009–12), among others.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue, at 89th Street, New York, NY 10128

This group exhibition features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek. The exhibition and its accompanying catalogue examine an important new development in contemporary photography, offering an opportunity to define the concerns of a younger generation of artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures. While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Institution Hours: Sunday through Wednesday & Friday, 10AM – 5:45PM; extended hours Saturday to 7:45PM
RSVP: No

Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection

American Folk Art Museum
2 Lincoln Square, New York, NY 10023

Enigmatic, evocative, and often simply strange, fraternal references are a rich part of contemporary American popular culture. But the seductive mystique of secret societies, with their cryptic signs, gestures, and arcane rituals, has been inculcated in our American experience since the early eighteenth century. Before the age of mass production, the artist who painted a portrait or embellished a piece of furniture might have also decorated a parade banner, an apron, symbols on a chart, or a backdrop for a fraternal lodge. More important, he or she encoded the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom—the core of fraternal teachings—into the many forms associated with fraternal practice. The iconic art and objects showcased in Mystery and Benevolence relate the tenets of fraternal belief through a potent combination of highly charged imagery, form, and meaning. The exhibition explores the fascinating visual landscape of fraternal culture through almost two hundred works of art comprising a major gift to the American Folk Art Museum from Kendra and Allan Daniel.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday, 11:30AM – 7:30PM; Friday, 12PM – 7pm; Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Maestà: Gaddi's Triptych Reunited

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

After conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum and a two-year absence, New-York Historical's Madonna and Child Enthroned with Ten Saints: Maestà (1867.375) is back on Central Park West. Painted ca. 1334 by Taddeo Gaddi, the major disciple of Giotto, it was recently shown at both the Getty and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in the major exhibition Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300-1350. To celebrate its triumphal return, the jewel-like panel takes pride of place in a small focus exhibition highlighting its conservation treatment.



With its lavish gold leaf background, Gaddi’s panel was an expensive commission for a private Florentine palazzo and for its time was cutting-edge art. Originally the central section of a folding triptych consisting of three panels, it is exhibited with two wings (sportelli) from a private collection that recently have been linked to it. Their similar dates, measurements, traces of hinges, and related iconographies suggest that the trio may once have been part of the same triptych. At the very least, seen together they help us to envision and reconstruct how the Maestà appeared in its original glory. Thomas Jefferson Bryan bequeathed the Gaddi panel to N-YHS in 1867, along with his entire collection. Bryan was an early connoisseur of Italian “primitives,” i.e., painters before Raphael, a taste then avant-garde. As New York City's first museum, New-York Historical wrote an early chapter in preserving the culture of the City, and Bryan played a pioneering role in its collecting history, amassing works by both European and American artists. Fittingly, Gaddi's painting is displayed with several other fourteenth- and early-fifteenth-century Italian panels from the Bryan (both sacred and profane, such as a cassone front with the Triumph of Caesar) and Thomas Sully's dashing portrait of the young Bryan. Other materials illuminates this donor's contribution to the history of American collecting.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street), New York, NY 10024

Every 15 minutes, for nearly a year, 500 men, women, and children rose majestically into “the egg,” Eero Saarinen’s idiosyncratic theater at the 1964 World’s Fair. It was very likely their first introduction to computer logic. Computing was not new. But for the general public, IBM’s iconic pavilion was a high profile coming out party, and Silicon City focuses on this moment to introduce New York’s pivotal role in the Digital Age.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM; Sunday 11AM – 5PM; extended hours Friday to 8PM
RSVP: No

Mika Tajima

11R Eleven Rivington
Ground Floor, 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

Mika Tajima, mixed media installation

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Tête-a-Tête: Portraits in Dialogue

Allan Stone Projects
535 W 22nd Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY, 10011

Diverse portraits in painting, drawing and sculpture, reflecting the visual discourse between Modern Masters and Contemporary artists in the Allan Stone Collection, including Robert Arneson, Balthus, Bo Bartlett, William Beckman, Willem de Kooning, John DeAndrea, George Deem, Richard Estes, Arshile Gorky, John Graham, Susan Hauptman, Elizabeth King, Franz Kline, Richard Lethem, Raoul Middleman, Diana Moore, Stephen Cornelius Roberts, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Wayne Thiebaud, James Weeks, and Jack Whitten.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

World Made By Hand

Andrew Edlin Gallery
212 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

Andrew Edlin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition World Made By Hand, featuring 70 artists engaged in the medium of drawing. Devoid of dependence on any form of technology, these works depict imagery that is primarily derived from nature and the unselfconscious minds of its creators. Free from overt references to 20th or 21st century popular culture these artists tap into their immediate external and internal environments, often evoking a dreamlike vision unfiltered by artistic conventions.



The genesis for the exhibition World Made By Hand is the 2008 novel of the same title by James Howard Kunstler, in which citizens of a rural town in upstate New York rebuild their society in the aftermath of devastating personal loss due to nuclear destruction, epidemics and economic collapse that has all but eliminated the comforts of modern living – no electricity, automobiles, common medications like antibiotics, or any kind of mass food production. In short, almost nothing can be taken for granted.



The townspeople in the story World Made By Hand are unencumbered by the rules imposed on them by a culture that no longer exists. While focused on basic survival strategies, they revert to fundamental humanist principles and biblical eye-for-an-eye justice. They discard pre-disaster 21st century norms and rebuild a pathway out of their dystopian nightmare towards a brighter, even utopian future. Children born after the crisis have little frame of reference of what life was like before. Similarly, the artists in this exhibition are not bound by artistic protocol, and are either unaware of or see little value in the dominant gestural trends of the late 20th century. The drawings here are primordial yet hopeful, suffused in the raw ether that permeates the very DNA of art.



World Made By Hand will be accompanied by a series of performances and events. The gallery thanks Sam Gordon for his contribution towards the organization and curation of this exhibition.

Institution Hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 10AM – 6PM, Sunday 12PM – 6PM

Andrea Bowers: Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?

Andrew Kreps Gallery
537-535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Rosalind Fox Solomon: Got to Go

Bruce Silverstein
545 West 24th Street New York, NY 10011

Part memoir and part fiction, Got To Go presents a collection of photographs from across Rosalind Fox Solomon’s life, contrasting a narrative of her own early years with other, urgent images that reveal a wider vision of the world, one outside of the rigid boundaries imposed by society and the home. If biography is a net cast upon us by family and shaped by social codes, Fox Solomon lays bare the limits of the net, as she negotiates the cusp between lived life and her imagination. Describing the work as a “tragicomedy”, full of both humour and pathos, Fox Solomon probes the limits we impose on ourselves, not only social codes but also the inherited tenets which are so difficult to escape.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Paul Scher: U.S.A.

Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery
505 W 24th Street, New York, NY 10001

U.S.A. is an exhibition of hand-painted maps by renowned graphic designer Paula Scher. Through these large-scale cartographic works, she has created a novel way of mapping traditional information, while subjectively twisting and confounding it. Intricate, colorful and obsessively detailed, her paintings have the foundations of accuracy, but are ultimately impressionistic visions of our interconnected world.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Arrangements

Carolina Nitsch
101 Wooster Street, New York, NY 10012

Work by Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, and Niele Toroni. The pieces in this exhibition explore the artist’s interpretation and experimentation with space, location and three-dimensional relationships.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11AM – 5PM, Saturday 12PM – 5PM

Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd.
134-140 Greene Street, New York, NY 10012

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. invites you to Francisco Matto: Another Way of Seeing, a retrospective exhibition of paintings, wood constructions and works on paper by Uruguayan artist Francisco Matto (1911-1995) on view February 25 through May 2016.







For The Armory Show 2016, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. booth will also feature a concise overview of Francisco Matto’s oeuvre. Matto's vision can be summarized as the search for "elemental" forms. By eliminating the superfluous and concentrating on the most important lines and volumes from reality and methodically isolating them, his works condense meaning with the most expressive simplicity. His minimalist and austere wood reliefs, totems and paintings, however, have a magic quality that derives from the organic simplicity of the forms and the delicate interplay of rhythm and proportion. With a sensitive line, a subtle touch of color, Matto redeemed the rough surface and texture of used and discarded wood, imprinting in it the sheer clarity and power of his unique personality.







According to Mari Carmen Ram-rez, curator of Latin American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Matto's planar totem sculptures and wood reliefs, blend into a single shape and form multiple allusions to the symbols and expressions of ancient civilizations and in particular of pre-Columbian art. For as early as 1932, Matto traveled to Southern Argentina and Chile where he became aware of the aesthetic as well as the religious and ritualistic functions in tribal art. With time he put together a remarkable collection of Peruvian and Mexican pre-Columbian art which was a source of inspiration for him. One of Joaqan Torres-Garc-a’s most innovative and talented students, Francisco Matto, assimilated the constructivist aesthetic of the Taller Torres-Garc_a, but went beyond it, creating a fresh and vibrant fusion of the old and the new.



Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12PM – 6PM

Tom LaDuke: New Works

CRG Gallery
195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002

CRG Gallery is pleased to present Los Angeles-based artist Tom LaDuke’s third solo exhibition with the gallery. LaDuke draws references from art history, popular culture, religious imagery and personal memories to create multi-layered objects and paintings that pull back the veil on visual perception and our conception of the real.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Dove Bradshaw

Danese/Corey
511 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Karla Black

David Zwirner
525 West 19th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sherrie Levine

David Zwirner
537 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Carrie Moyer: Siren

DC Moore Gallery
535 W 22nd Street #2, New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Nick Brandt: Inherit the Dust Armory Show Preview

Edwynn Houk Gallery
745 5th Avenue #407, New York, NY 10151

From Thursday, March 3rd- Saturday, March 5th Edwynn Houk Gallery will offer a special preview of Nick Brandt's new exhibition Inherit the Dust for attendees of The Armory Show. For the exhibition Brandt has returned to East Africa to photograph the escalating changes of the continent’s natural world and its animals in a series of epic panoramas. In each location, Brandt erected a life-size panel of one of his animal portrait photographs—showing groups of elephants, rhinos, giraffes, lions, cheetahs and zebras—within sites of explosive urban development in order to demonstrate the displacement of these animals from what was once their natural habitat.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films

Galerie Lelong
528 West 26th Street New York, NY 10001

Ana Mendieta: Experimental and Interactive Films is the first full-scale gallery exhibition dedicated to Mendieta’s filmworks in New York. Revealing aspects of Mendieta’s practice that are not as widely known as her ritualistic investigations of body and landscape, the exhibition demonstrates Mendieta’s technical innovations and her singular approach to the medium. The fifteen filmworks comprising the exhibition—nine of which have never been seen before—are newly transferred from their original media to digital formats. These transfers reveal detail and a vibrancy of color and contrast, while preserving these critical works for future generations.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything

Garth Greenan Gallery
529 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Mark Greenwold: The Rumble of Panic Underlying Everything features three of the artist’s recent paintings, as well as a selection of preparatory drawings. A self-proclaimed “emotional cubist,” Greenwold uses painting to explore the complex relationships between humans—usually family and friends—in ambiguous, often claustrophobic settings. This is Greenwold’s first solo-exhibition with Garth Greenan Gallery. A catalogue is available, with an essay by Wayne Koestenbaum.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Conrad Marca Relli: Reconsidered

Hollis Taggart Galleries
7th Floor, 521 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday10AM – 5PM, Saturday 11AM – 5PM

William Gedney

Howard Greenberg Gallery
41 East 57th Street, Suite 1406, New York NY 10022

An exhibition of influential photographs by William Gedney made in Kentucky and across the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from February 4 – March 19, 2016. Gedney’s intimate portrayals of out-of-work coal miners and their families in rural Kentucky, hippie culture scenes from San Francisco, and his lonely-streets-at-night pictures from his travels around the U.S. are elegant and rife with yearning.



Simple and direct, Gedney’s photographs reward the viewer with an intimate look at people living on the edge of polite society. As Szarkowski stated in the press release for the 1968 show, “Gedney’s pictures make it clear that the individuals are more complex and more interesting than the cliches.” The photographs offer a sympathetic and graceful view of Gedney’s subjects, portraying Southern men fixing their cars, children washing on a porch in Kentucky, and handsome hippies among a crowd in San Francisco with the same sensitivity. Gedney’s night pictures – of still cars and houses on empty streets – are devoid of people and movement and hint at an aching universal loneliness.



Gedney wrote incessantly and kept many journals, some of which will also be on view at the Gallery. In 1962, he noted:



"What matters most of all, is to penetrate into the pulsing of life of the people themselves, to become imbued with their way of living, and to see their faces when they sing at their weddings, harvests and funerals, and from all these associations to distill and preserve something more significant than a song on record, something beyond music and words, an abstract essence that will remain a living force within you."



Gedney’s archive, including thousands of photographs and writings, was donated to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University in Durham, NC, in 1992. The archive provides scholars and students alike with remarkable access to Gedney’s vision and intellect. A portion of the archive is accessible online for the purposes of research, teaching, private study, or general interest.



Gedney was highly regarded in his lifetime, though his work was not well known beyond a small circle of colleagues and curators, which included photographers Lee Friedlander, Raghubir Singh, and John Szarkowski who curated Eastern Kentucky and San Francisco: Photographs by William Gedney (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Gedney died of AIDS in 1989. The show at Howard Greenberg Gallery will include early work that hasn’t been seen in nearly 40 years.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin

Jack Shainman Gallery
513 W 20th Street, New York, NY 10011

Jack Shainman Gallery will present two exhibitions during Armory Arts Week, 2016. Our 513 West 20th Street gallery will feature a group show, Of a Different Nature featuring works by El Anatsui, Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Maya Lin. At our 524 West 24th Street gallery, Claudette Schreuders will present an exhibition of new works, entitled Note to Self.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Fred Tomaselli, Early Work or How I Became a Painter

James Cohan Gallery
533 W 26th Street, New York, NY 10001

James Cohan is pleased to announce an exhibition by Fred Tomaselli entitled Early Work or How I Became a Painter, the artist’s fifth solo presentation at the gallery, opening at our Chelsea location on Friday, February 5 from 6PM– 8PM, and remaining on view through Saturday, March 19, 2016. The exhibition features two immersive and four interactive artworks made between 1984 and 1990 and a group of mixed-media paintings and works on paper from the 1990s. Many of these works have not been shown in New York since the 1990s, and in some cases, not since the 1980s.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Jannis Varelas

James Fuentes
55 Delancey Street, New York, NY 10002

James Fuentes is pleased to announce it's first exhibition with Greek painter Jannis Varelas.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Barry Stone: The Future of Things Past

Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery
54 Ludlow Street, New York, NY 10002

Austin-based photographer Barry Stone's new solo exhibition of images both "straight" and manipulated.

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday 11AM – 6PM

Land/Sky: Temporal Concepts: New Works by Dean Byington, IC-98, and Laurel Nakadate

Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects
535 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

David Rodriguez Caballero: Vinyls

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

George Rickey: Selected Works from the Estate 1954-2000

Marlborough Gallery
40 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Saturday 10AM – 5:30PM

Claire Falkenstein: A Selection of Works from 1955-1975

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Norman Lewis: A Selection of Paintings and Drawings

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
100 11th Avenue, New York NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Neil Raitt

Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
327 Broome Street, New York, NY 10002

Neil Raitt’s paintings are compositions of endlessly repeated cabins, mountains, ponds, trees and other natural motifs. Exploring the idea of repetition itself as a form of abstraction, Raitt’s work addresses landscape painting and the accessibility of its figurative form. With gestures adopted from Bob Ross’ television program The Joy of Painting, Raitt utilizes identifiable imagery in his intricate patterns that suspend the atmospheric effect of landscape and its illusion of space, dispersing any sense of perspective. His labyrinthine patterning and ceaseless repetition suggest the imagery upon the canvas as a limitless flat patchwork that stretches into infinity. While Raitt’s work implies an accelerated machine-like production process, his work is borne of time-consuming and heavily labored oil painting. Raitt’s technical skill in painting modernizes the traditional landscape, deconstructing its figurative language with an approach that is neither wholly kitsch nor fully abstracted.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Robert Zandvliet- Shades

Peter Blum Gallery
20 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019

Peter Blum Gallery will present new works by the Dutch painter, Robert Zandvliet in an Exhibition titled Shades.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 11AM – 6PM

Keith Cottingham: Biology & Cosmology: Below the Visible

Ronald Feldman Fine Arts
31 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Alejandro Campins: Lapse

Sean Kelly
475 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

James White: ASPECT:RATIO

Sean Kelly
476 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10018

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11AM – 6PM; Saturday 10AM – 6PM

New York Topographics: Bernd and Hilla Becher, Nicholas Nixon, Thomas Struth

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10001

A selection of photographs taken in 1970s New York City by three leading postwar photographers.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10AM – 6PM; Saturday 11AM – 6PM

No exhibition, gallery will be open

Susan Sheehan Gallery
136 East 16th Street New York, NY 10003

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Tomie Ohtake: Solo Exhibition

Tina Kim Gallery
525 West 21st Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Craig Kauffman: Wall Reliefs

Vivian Horan Fine Art
35 East 67th Street New York, NY 10065

A exhibition of selected vacuum formed acrylic works by the late California sculptor.

Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 10AM – 6PM

Olivo Barbieri: Adriatic Sea (staged) Dancing People

Yancey Richardson Gallery
525 West 22nd Street New York, NY 10011

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Chris McCaw

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue New York, NY 10001

Exhibition

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

BRONX:AFRICA

Bronx Council on the Arts: Longwood Art Gallery
On the campus of Hostos Community College: 450 Grand Concourse, Room C-190 (at 149th Street) Bronx, NY 10451

The BRONX:AFRICA exhibit (#BronxAfrica) features contemporary art across disciplines along with Program Ambassador events around the Bronx and beyond.Our borough is home to major and still growing populations from various countries in Africa. Their vital presence influences and transforms our city. BRONX:AFRICA is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the art, expressions and influences of African cultures, and their impact on the arts as nationals mix and infuse. BRONX:AFRICA celebrates the influence of contemporary African cultures that strengthens and connects us with the many peoples of African descent, the diaspora, mixed heritage and migration-dispersion that call the Bronx home. (Image Caption: Eto Otitigbe, Ascension or Dude Ascending Staircase, 2011)

Institution Hours: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, Friday, 12PM – 5PM

Kon Trubkovich: OCT. PM.

Marianne Boesky Gallery
20 Clinton Street, New York, NY 10022

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Anima exhibition by Prune Nourry and Takao Shiraishi

The Invisible Dog Art Center
51 Bergen Street, Brooklyn NY 11201

The multi-sensory exhibition Anima is a meditation on the divide between Man and Animal and a reflection on the concept of the soul as told through a legendary Lacandon figure, K’in Obregon. Obregon is an important character for the Lacandon Maya people, who have been living who have been living in the Mesoamerican Rainforest for centuries. Valentine Losseau, an anthropologist and dramatist, has been working with K’in Obregon’s family for seven years, and spoke with K’in about his strange and mysterious life shortly before his death. This project was conceived during a meeting between anthropologist Valentine Losseau and Prune Nourry, an artist-in-residence at The Invisible Dog Art Center. After an exploratory trip to Mexico, several artists from disparate fields, united by a common train of thought, worked together to create this immersive and unprecedented experience in the heart of New York City.

6:00PM - 10:00PM
Institution Hours: Monday through Sunday, 11AM – 7PM
RSVP: No

The Bronx Speaks: Our Home

Bronx Arts Alliance
305 East 140th Street, Bronx, NY 10454

Curated in two spaces—BronxArtSpace in Mott Haven and Andrew Freedman Home on Grand Concourse—this exhibition will feature works that address the concept and meaning of “home.” Utilizing diverse media, including the visual and performing arts, the exhibition will function as a platform for artists to “speak,” lending image to spaces both within the self and external world. In an intentionally timely manner, THE BRONX SPEAKS: OUR HOME comes as working class neighborhoods—located in the Bronx and beyond—are increasingly being “discovered,” becoming attractive destinations due to inexpensive real estate potential. What is ignored, however, is the art and culture that has flourished within these areas for decades, and the potential for erasure and displacement. This exhibition will reveal the complex feelings that “home” encompasses, interpreted and elucidated through the artist’s eye, revealing the dynamism of the Bronx arts scene that’s happening right here, right now. Curated by Sarah Corona. (Image Caption: Felipe Garcia, El Rincon Criollo, Las Casitas, 2015, digital print on luster paper, 13 x 19 inches. Courtesy of the artist.)

5:00PM - 9:00PM
Opening Reception will take place at two spaces with overlapping times (shuttles run between both): BronxArtSpace, 5 – 8PM and Andrew Freedman Home with performances by BombaYo, 7 – 10PM Institution Hours: Monday through Friday, 9AM – 5PM General
RSVP: No

Book Signing & Reception with Firooz Zahedi author of My Elizabeth, published by Glitterati Incorporated at Leila Heller Gallery

Leila Heller Gallery
568 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001

Hosted by Beth Rudin DeWoody, Paul Morris and Leila Heller, this reception honors Firooz Zahedi’s newest book, My Elizabeth. Documenting a little-known era of Taylor’s life, from age 44 to the end of the star’s life, Taylor’s photos in My Elizabeth, many of which are never-before-published, offer a singular glimpse into her private life. Zahedi reveals an extraordinarily playful and yet whimsical, down-to-earth spirit not otherwise captured by celebrity photographers. The reception at Leila Heller Gallery will coincide with Shoja Azari & Shahram Karimi’s exhibition, Dreamscape, on view February 18 – March 26.

6:00PM - 8:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10AM – 6PM, Mondays by appointment

Artist Talk | Mike Cooter: The Thousand Eyes 

Swiss Institute
18 Wooster Street, NY NY 10013

Artist Mike Cooter introduces his practice in the context of the new exhibition at the Swiss Institute, looking at the curatorial framework of artworks produced for cinema with specific focus on his PhD research into the structural agency of objects and the MacGuffin. Cooter is currently post-producing a six-part radio drama about an object, Dingus, to be released in 2016, and recently made a large-scale installation for the 31st Biennial of Graphic Arts (Ljubljana, 2015). In addition to the exhibition at the Swiss Institute he will present new work in Another Reality: After Lina Bo Bardi, this summer at Stroom Den Haag (NL).

5:00PM - 7:00PM
Institution Hours:Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: Yes. RSVP to rsvp@swissinstitute.net

Dispatch: Artist Talks on International Collaborations

Art in General
79 Walker Street, New York, NY 10013

In the context of Beyond Credit, a group exhibition of Georgian artists presented in partnership with the Center of Contemporary Art – Tbilisi, Georgia, three New York-based artists will reflect back on their recent experiences with Art in General's International Collaborations Program in the Eastern European region. This series of artist talks will include individual presentations on projects shown in Tbilisi and Riga during 2015, and tackle larger concerns around trans-national exchange, including questions of political and infrastructural difference, site-specificity, value distribution, productive failure and experimentation.



While firmly rooted in New York City, Art in General has a long history of working internationally. The International Collaborations Program provides emerging artists abroad with the opportunity to create and present new work in New York, introducing audiences to exciting artists from regions of the world that are otherwise underrepresented in the U.S. The program also offers New York-based artists opportunities to engage with, and present works at, international partner institutions. The program’s institutional partnerships span two or more years to facilitate an exchange that is reciprocal in its goals and provides the capacity for audience and network building.



In 2015, Donna Huanca: Polystyrene's Braces, and Ezra Wube: Palindrome were exhibited at kim? Contemporary Art Center (Riga, Latvia) and Adelita Husni-Bey: Postcards from the Desert Island was shown as part of the 2nd Tbilisi Triennial, organized by the Center of Contemporary Art (Tbilisi, Georgia).

(Image Credit: Donna Huanca, Muscle Memory detail, 2015. Courtesy of artist and Peres Projects)

4:00PM - 5:30PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11AM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Hales New York Opening Reception

Hales London | New York
64 Delancey St, New York, NY 10002

7:00PM - 9:00PM
RSVP: No

food nostalgia

Radiator Arts
10-61 Jackson Ave, Long Island City, NY 11106

Artists: Cey Adams, Emilie Baltz, Disorientalism (Katherine Behar and Marianne M. Kim), Gonzalo Fuenmajor, Kira Nam Greene, Jonathan Stein

Curator: Amanda McDonald Crowley



Radiator Gallery is pleased to present food nostalgia, an exhibition of paintings, photographs, video, sculpture and installation works by artists Cey Adams (New York), Emilie Baltz (New York), Disorientalism (Katherine Behar and Marianne M. Kim, New York/ Arizona), Gonzalo Fuenmajor (Miami, FL), Kira Nam Greene (New York) and Jonathan Stein (Coral Springs, FL).



food nostalgia looks at food in contemporary America through a lens of fast food iconography and industrial food production” says curator, Amanda McDonald Crowley. “Participating artists variously draw on popular cultural references, brand recognition, bodies, memory, nostalgia, and playfulness. They ask us to think about our relationship to our colonial pasts, feminist thinking, cultural diversity, and marketing culture. The corporatisation of our food systems is deeply entrenched in our psyche; historical and contemporary trade routes of our food affect our cultural landscape.” As a framework to explore how we cook, eat, and consume, food nostalgia will be a platform to share ideas, and food.



Kira Nam Greene’s paintings and drawings are conceptual self-portraits with collaged images of food and complex patterns that represent the plurality and multiplicity of her identity as an Asian-American woman.

For Kira, food acts as a metaphor for the idealization of the female body and the surrogate for desire to consume and control. During a residency in the “bread basket” of America, her Nebraska Suite series is the first time that she consciously used fast food imagery in her work.



Emilie Baltz grew up in Joliet, Illinois in a house without junk food.

Her French mother was an incredibly creative and healthy cook, but all around her families were serving up junk food. A little jealous, and a lot intrigued, this experience inspired her Junk Foodie series: her images are both alien and familiar, but mostly fun interpretations of traditional recipes rendered using junk food ingredients.



Jonathan Stein finds his inspiration in grocery stores and fast-food spots. In his Shiny Sparkly Goes Down Easy series Jonathan takes iconic images such as Spam, Ritz crackers and a bucket of KFC to create bling objects where shinier is better and a glitzy surface masks a loaded commentary on fast food consumption.



Cey Adams also draws inspiration from popular iconography and brand recognition. In Cream of Wheat Cey takes the iconographic brand image, reputedly a portrait of African American chef, Frank L White and using collage and design principles, creates a richly textured and subtly rendered black on black painterly abstraction.



Gonzalo Fuenmayor’s Papare series examines ideas of exoticism and the complicit and amnesic relationship between ornamentation and tragedy.

Opulent Victorian chandeliers and other elements, reminiscent of a decadent colonial past, proliferate from banana bunches, alluding to a tragic and violent history associated with Banana trade worldwide.



Disorentalism’s Maiden Voyage focuses on race and labor in American food production and promotion. The Disorientals track down the Land O’ Lakes Indian Maiden, who has been reborn as an empowered executive.



food nostagia takes a critical, yet humorous, look at how junk food and brand cultures impact contemporary food systems and consumption.

6:00PM - 9:00PM
Institution Hours: Friday and Sunday, 1PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Brunch at Aperture Foundation / Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs

Aperture Foundation
4th Floor, 547 W 27th St, New York, NY 10001

Join us on Saturday, March 5, 2016, for coffee and pastries to celebrate the exhibition, Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs, at Aperture’s gallery in Chelsea. Mickalene Thomas, known for her large-scale, multi-textured, and rhinestone-encrusted paintings of domestic interiors and portraits, has also identified the photographic image as a defining touchstone for her practice. Thomas first began to photograph herself and her mother as a student at Yale—a pivotal experience for her as an artist. While working across multiple series, much of her photographic work functions as a personal act of deconstruction and reappropriation—both of images she has created herself and images she has singled out as influence. With each series, she grapples with and asserts new definitions of beauty and inspiration. (Image Credit: Mickalene Thomas, La leçon d_amour, 2008 © Mickalene Thomas. Courtesy the artist; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

10:00AM - 12:00PM
Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Sunday March 6th

Fung Wah Biennial

Flux Factory
39-31 29th Street, Long Island City, NY 11101

During the first three weekends in March 2016, three regular Chinatown buses will leave NYC to venture to a new city and back. Artists will create works to be presented specifically on the bus while en route traveling to their respective destinations. The audience will become a mixture of those who have knowingly signed up for the Fung Wah Biennial and those who are simply traveling by bus (i.e. innocent bystanders). In each city we will partner with local artist-run spaces for lectures and tours to get to know better our neighboring city centers and their creative output. Each trip will be co-organized by Matthias Borello, Will Owen, or Sally Szwed. The last week of the month Flux Factory will host an exhibition in the Flux Factory Gallery re-enacting the works created on the buses as well as show documentation from the three bus journeys.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1PM – 7PM
RSVP: Yes, at FluxFactory.org/Events/Fung-Wah-Biennial/

Lettuce, Artichokes, Red Beets, Mangoes, Broccoli, Honey and Nutmeg: The Essex Street Market as Collaborator

Artists Alliance
Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space; 120 Essex Street (inside Essex Market), New York, NY 10002

Featuring projects by Laia Solé, Antonia Pérez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Mary Ting, Beatrice Glow, and Harley Spiller

Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful



Six socially conscious artists engage Essex Market vendors, customers and the Market itself in their artistic processes as a means of co-generating works centered on the people who labor side-by-side with Cuchifritos Gallery. The cubicle comprising the exhibition space is, therefore, meant to become one with the stalls dispensing food. With this in mind, the participating artists and their hosting collaborators bring to the forefront issues relevant to their respective trades, while paying attention to the narratives as well as to the material culture that their presence in the place spawns.



Each of the foods listed in the title of this exhibition links an item sold by the merchants with the first letter of the name of the contributing artists and of the curator: Lettuce-Laia, Artichokes-Antonia, Red Beets-Ricardo, Mangoes- Mary, Broccoli-Beatrice, Honey-Harley, and Nutmeg-Nicolás.



Image: Laia Solé, CHROMAKEYING, 2014. Action produced with IDENSITAT and in collaboration with Recreant Cruïlles. Photo: Jordina Sangrà.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM
RSVP: No

Floss: Pino Pascali and Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Marianne Boesky Gallery is pleased to present Floss, a two-person installation of Pino Pascali’s Bachi da Setola and the extruded paintings of Donald Moffett.

Institution Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 10AM – 6PM

Excursus: Homage to the Square3 (Dia:Beacon)

Dia Art Foundation
3 Beekman Street in Beacon, New York.

Robert Irwin’s Excursus: Homage to the Square3 was originally commissioned by Dia for its former space at 548 West 22nd Street in New York City. The installation opened in April 1998 with the title Prologue: x183 and consisted of eighteen interconnected rooms set apart by transparent scrims. Irwin also covered the gallery windows with blue and gray theatrical gels, invoking a subtle color palette that changed in tone through shifts in natural light. He reconfigured Prologue that summer, adjusting the point of entry, installing vertical fluorescent tubes in each room, and introducing an intensity of vivid colors into the work. Retitled Excursus: Homage to the Square3, the second version has become a seminal work for Irwin, which Dia acquired in 2000. For this new installation at Dia:Beacon, the artist redesigned Excursus to engage with the museum’s architectural and lighting specificities, a technique he has articulated as “site-conditioned,” in which “the sculptural response draws all its cues (reasons for being) from its surroundings.”

Institution Hours: Wednesday through Sunday, 12PM – 6PM

Robert Ryman (Dia:Chelsea)

Dia Art Foundation
545 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011

This comprehensive exhibition brings together six decades of Robert Ryman’s vital paintings, ranging in date from the 1950s through the 2000s. Since the 1950s, Ryman’s works have been both readily identified and identifiable by their achromatic surfaces. Viewers see and experience these painted frequencies of light as the color white, but Ryman’s radical exploration of the tonal values, light reflections, and spatial effects of white were never limited to paint. Very early on his experimentations with canvas, board, and paper expanded to include aluminum, fiberglass,