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September 9-12, 2021   Javits Center

#ArmoryAccess

Armory Access offers a platform for galleries from The Armory Show 2020 Presents section with the goal of facilitating digital engagement with their current gallery exhibitions.

Baik + Khneysser | Yesterday - Tomorrow

Baik Art is pleased to present Yesterday-Tomorrow, a group exhibition examining the marginalizing effects of polarized institutional governance on a country’s inhabitants during times of political campaign and unrest.

About the Exhibition

Yesterday-Tomorrow is a group exhibition featuring works by Juan Capistran, Rakeem Cunningham, Aaron Sandnes, and Taravat Talepasand. This installation examines the marginalizing effects of polarized institutional governance on a country’s inhabitants during times of political campaign. Reflecting on tensions associated with bi-partisan representation, this show questions the efficacy of promoting value systems through codices of pre-ordained thought– An inquiry that reminds us of how socio-political problems of our past, if not re-evaluated equitably, will inevitably become the obstacles of our tomorrow.

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Why does economic growth insinuate exploitation? How do acts of inclusion trigger radicalized congregation? And what links the empowerment of oppressed individuals to the creation of an adversarial villain? All are questions often subverted within the discourse of political correctness and patriotism. Therefore, we must challenge this fixation on what’s right and wrong and good or evil– as these metrics lack the empathy to overcome our perpetual need for a loser. Works in this exhibition utilize motifs associated with anarchist philosophy to challenge paradoxical notions that have yielded a political zero-sum game.

Curated by Joshua Hossain Hashemzadeh.

About the Artist: Rakeem Chunningham

Rakeem Cunningham is a visual artist and photographer based out of Los Angeles, California. Born in 1992, his work explores themes of self-identity, queer politics, identity politics, self-acceptance, and the navigation of body politics under the queer landscape. Cunningham studied Design and Media Arts at UCLA and is a current member of Montevista Projects in Los Angeles. Cunningham has shown in the Castelli Art Space, Southbay LGBT Center, Los Angeles LGBT Center, the TAG Gallery Loft, and the Littman and White galleries in Portland, Oregon.

About the Artist: Taravat Talepasand

Via paintings, drawings, sculptures, and installations, Taravat Talepasand reconsiders the ideological assumptions that index Iranian identity, state power, and gender in order to consider how body and image come to signify and rebel against normative notions of Iranian subjectivity. Her interest, however, is in painting a present, which is of and intrinsically linked to the past, making it easily understood by Iranians and indicative of assumption for the Westerner.

About the Artist: Juan Capistran

Born 1976 in Guadalajara, Mexico Juan Capistrán works in sculpture, painting, video, photography, drawing, installation, performance, and sound—whichever method best serves the specific project. A Mexican-born artist who grew up in a predominantly African American neighborhood in Los Angeles, Capistrán deftly maneuvers between subjects ranging from the civil rights movement to punk music to the art of the 1960s, blending practices, references, and themes into subversive critiques of American culture. Capistrán’s work borrows equally from renowned artists such as Carl Andre, as well as hip-hop, disco, and gang culture, culminating in pieces and performances that often dip into the cool, distant nature of minimalism while referencing the politics inherent in the colored body. Frequently titled with references to pop culture, the work offers a broad entry point that shows Capistrán’s personal history with stark political expression.

About the Artist: Aaron Sandnes

Aaron Sandnes’s multimedia practice is deeply influenced by his upbringing in Southern California in the 1990s, and his early experiences working on custom cars and making music. Sandnes, who builds custom motorcycles in addition to making art, identifies among his subjects speed, alienation, criminality, the Punk movement, historic visions of the future, and destruction. In a series of prints, “Destruction My Beatrice” (2009), Sandnes collected illustrations dating from the 1950s and ’60s depicting utopian futures and ideas of leisure. He then distorted, discolored, and eroded these such that only fragments of the originals were recognizable. More recently, he has become interested in grease as a material, both for its properties and its technological implications; it has been the primary medium in a series of portraits depicting members of La Bande à Bonnot, an early-20th-century, French anarchist group.

Exhibition Artwork

Inquire with the gallery for up-to-date availability and further details

Rakeem Cunningham
Queer Negro Composition #3, 2020
48x72
Photographic print
Image courtesy of the artist
Taravat Talepasand
End-Less-War, 2020
12.5 x 17.5
LSD and Watercolor on Iraqi Dinar
Image courtesy of the artist
Taravat Talepasand
Opium Tears 1, 2017
21.5x 17.5
Egg tempera on linen
Image courtesy of the artist
Taravat Talepasand
Opium Tears 2, 2017
21.5x 17.5
Egg tempera on linen
Image courtesy of the artist
Juan Capistran
Les Frontieres On Sen Fout, 2020
95 x 233
Pigs blood, sweat, tears, and urine
Image courtesy of the artist
Juan Capistran
This Text Is The Beginning Of A Plan, 2016
6.5 x 19.25
Riso prints on paper
Image courtesy of the artist
Aaron Sandnes
I Can Never Cease And Desist, 2016
14.25 x 30
Acrylic and graphite on paper
Image courtesy of the artist
Aaron Sandnes
I Can Never Fuck Off And Die, 2016
14.25 x 30
Acrylic and graphite on paper
Image courtesy of the artist
Aaron Sandnes
I Can Never Be Your Enemy, 2016
14.25 x 30
Acrylic and graphite on paper
Image courtesy of the artist
Aaron Sandnes
I Can Never Forget This Memory, 2016
14.25 x 30
Acrylic and graphite on paper
Image courtesy of the artist
Aaron Sandnes
I Can Never Remember What It Was Like, 2016
14.25 x 30
Acrylic and graphite on paper
Image courtesy of the artist