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September 9-12, 2021   Javits Center

#ArmoryAccess

Armory Access offers a platform for galleries from The Armory Show 2020 Presents section with the goal of facilitating digital engagement with their current gallery exhibitions.

Voloshyn Gallery | Lesia Khomenko: Several Stories and Objects

In “Several Stories andIn “Several Stories and Objects,” Lesia Khomenko continues her programmatic work with deconstructing figurative imagery. The artist uses stretchers, objects, canvases, biflex fabric and netting to literally divide the paintings’ characters from the background. Her work offers ironic commentary on the traditional painterly techniques of glazing.

About the Exhibition

Artist Lesia Khomenko designed an installation of sculptural elements using stretchers, objects, canvases, Biflex fabric, and netting to literally divide the paintings’ characters from their background. Her work offers an ironic commentary on traditional painterly techniques of glazing.

The objects (paintings) presented in this exhibition tell stories united by the motif of Crimea. The protagonists represented in each painting can be provisionally subdivided into the two opposing camps. The first group is comprised of the artist’s friends, public figures born in Crimea who have left the peninsula. The second group represents Russian cultural figures who cannot legally enter Ukraine because they visited Crimea after the annexation. This list of artists is published on the Ministry of Culture of Ukraine's website. The protagonists forced to share the space enact a range of polemics that are not limited to their identity.

Painter Alevtyna Kakhidze is the guest artist. Her drawing Actually, it's Lesia drowning. Drawn a day after was made in 2001 during a plein-air retreat in Simeiz (Crimea), in which she participated with Khomenko. This drawing represents a real event. That day, Lesia Khomenko swam out into the stormy seas and couldn't make it back to the shore because of the waves. Khomenko's paintings representing crashing waves were largely influenced by this experience.

About the Artist: Lesia Khomenko

Lesia Khomenko was born in 1980 in Kyiv, where she lives and works now. She graduated from the National Academy of Fine Art and Architecture in 2004. Co-founder and member of the R.E.P. group since 2004. She was the Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Contemporary Art at the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in 2005-2006, and at LIA (Leipzig International Art Program) in 2008. A member of the curatorial group HUDRADA since 2008. Her works have been exhibited in many solo and group shows, including the main project of the 1st Kyiv Biennale of Contemporary Art Arsenale in 2012, at the National Art Museum of Ukraine in Kyiv, at the White Box Gallery in New York, at MUMOK in Vienna, and at Zachęta Gallery in Warsaw. She is the author and professor of contemporary art at the Kyiv Academy of Media Arts. Lesia Khomenko was shortlisted for PinchukArtPrize in 2009, 2011 and 2013, and for Future Generations Art Prize with the R.E.P. group in 2012 (both founded by Victor Pinchuk). She was nominated for the Kazimir Malevich Artist Award in 2012 and 2016. This year, she has been nominated for HeForShe Arts Week Prize.

Exhibition Artwork

Inquire with the gallery for up-to-date availability and further details

Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
80 × 110 × 69 cm
Acrylic on biflex, wooden chaise lounge
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
69 × 116 × 61 cm
Acrylic on biflex, wooden chaise lounge
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
200 × 201 cm (left panel: 175 x 125 cm and right panel: 201 x 117 cm)
Acrylic, canvas, stretcher, elastic net
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
200 × 125 cm
Acrylic, canvas, stretcher, elastic net
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
190 × 200 cm
Acrylic, canvas, stretcher, elastic net
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
200 × 703 cm
Acrylic, biflex, stretcher
Alevtina Kakhidze
Actually, it's Lesia drowning. Drawn a day after, 2001
40 × 60 cm
Pencil on paper
Lesia Khomenko
Untitled, 2020
100 х 160 cm and 60 х 80 cm
oil on canvas
left: Lesia Khomenko's painting from the “Giants” series (2010), right: Oleksii Revika's “NeUdel” (2013)