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March 5–8, 2020   Piers 90 and 94

Armory Live

Armory Live

Armory Live is a year-round program of conversations highlighting influential members of the international art community—hosted at the fair, online, and throughout New York City.

2020 Platform presentations announced

The Armory Show announces the 2020 Platform section, with seven large-scale projects that explore how contemporary artists use the genres of satire, caricature, and the grotesque as tools of social critique.

Anne Ellegood on the 2020 Platform section

Anne Ellegood speaks with The Armory Show about her unwavering belief in art as a catalyst for political and social change and her commitment to supporting large-scale initiatives.

 

2020 participating exhibitors announced

The Armory Show will welcome 178 exhibitors from 31 countries for an exciting 2020 edition featuring an expanded curatorial program and 30 first-time exhibitors

In Conversation: peter campus and Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan

One of the first generation of video artists, peter campus has pioneered ways of using video technologies to explore topics ranging from human psychology to the natural landscape. In conjunction with the presentation of his work at The Armory Show and his first museum survey in the United States—video ergo sum, opening on March 6th at the Bronx Museum—campus will be interviewed by Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan, Assistant Curator, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, about his single-channel videos and video installations dating back to the 1970s.

Recent Social Posts

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The Armory Show on Instagram

Galleries | “I collect everywhere I go, and I like to work with everyday life forms as opposed to high-art forms” says artist Alexis Smith. As a pioneer in making mixed-media collages and installations consisting of images, texts, and found objects, Smith creates alternative narratives in her work to acknowledge the pervasive fascination of popular culture and Hollywood stories, an interest that is owed to her upbringing in Los Angeles. Characterized by humor, irony, and poignancy, Smith’s works have commented on the illusion of the quintessential American transformational myth, the so-called American Dream, with often intentionally open-ended questions. “Midnight Cowbody” (2009) presented by @garthgreenangallery in the Galleries section. • • Image courtesy of the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery #TheArmoryShow #TheArmoryShow2020 #Pier94 #GarthGreenanGallery #AlexisSmith #ArtFair #NewYork
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@TheArmoryShow on Twitter

Galleries | Characterized by humor, irony, and poignancy, artist #AlexisSmith's works have commented on the illusio… https://t.co/0Gen2NLxUZ
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The Armory Show on Instagram

Galleries | “I want people to realize that color is not a certainty, but a circumstance,” said artist Carlos Crus Diez. In commemorating Diez, who passed away last summer, @ascasogallery will be presenting “Physichromie No. 139” (1964) from his famous "Physichromie" series in the Galleries section. As a pioneer of the Kinetic art movement during the 1950s and 1960s, Diez’s signature artistic practice employed moiré patterns, in which contrasting lines create a sensation of movement as viewers changes position relative to the work. • • Image courtesy of Ascaso Gallery #TheArmoryShow #TheArmoryShow2020 #Galleries #Pier94 #AscasoGallery #CarlosCruzDiez #ArtFair #newyork
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@TheArmoryShow on Twitter

Galleries | In commemorating artist #CarlosCrusDiez, who passed away last summer, #AscasoGallery will be presenting… https://t.co/8mpVEMAGmZ
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The Armory Show on Instagram

Galleries | “Men in the Cities,” arguably Robert Longo’s most iconic series, was inspired from the final scene of the film “The American Soldier” (1970), in which two gangsters are shot down unexpectedly and their bodies seem to dance as they fall to the ground. To create and capture these gestures, Longo invited his friends, including photographer Cindy Sherman and art dealer Larry Gagosian, to his studio in New York to photograph them while they were hit by tennis balls and dragged by ropes. The resulting images portray businessmen and women in dramatic, contorted poses. On view at @brookealexandergallery booth. • • Image courtesy of Brooke Alexander #TheArmoryShow #TheArmoryShow2020#Galleries #Pier94 #BrookeAlexander #RobertLongo #ArtFair #newyork
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@TheArmoryShow on Twitter

Galleries | Pictured here is “Men in the Cities” (1979-80), arguably #RobertLongo's most iconic series, which portr… https://t.co/e3uATn2Tm5
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@TheArmoryShow on Twitter

Platform | Mixing sculpture, sound, and filmmaking, artists #NathalieDjurberg and #HansBerg have worked collaborati… https://t.co/6ov9aamjcl
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